See also: DOE, Doe, do'e, and

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English do, from Old English (female deer), from Proto-West Germanic *daijā, from Proto-Germanic *dajjǭ (female deer, mother deer), from Proto-Germanic *dajjaną (to suckle), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeh₁(y)- (to suck (milk), to suckle).

Cognate with Scots da, dae (female deer), Alemannic German (doe), Danish (deer, doe), Sanskrit धेनु (dhenú, cow, milk-cow), Old English dēon (to suckle), Old English delu (teat). Related also to female, filial, fetus.

NounEdit

doe (plural does)

  1. A female deer; also used of similar animals such as antelope, (less commonly goat as nanny is also used).
    • 1995, News of the Universe: Poems of Twofold Consciousness (Sierra Club Books Publication)‎[1], University of California Press, →ISBN, LCCN 79012812, OCLC 1020196148, page 87:
      ...A doe from round a spruce stood looking at them
      Across the wall , as near the wall as they .
      She saw them in their field they her in hers .
      The difficulty of seeing what stood still , []
  2. A female rabbit.
  3. A female hare.
  4. A female squirrel.
  5. A female kangaroo.
SynonymsEdit
  • (female deer): hind (female red deer)
  • (female kangaroo): blue flyer (female red kangaroo)
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

doe (third-person singular simple present does, present participle doing or doth, simple past did or didde, past participle done)

  1. Obsolete spelling of do
    • 1603, Michel de Montaigne, chapter 17, in John Florio, transl., The Essayes [], book II, London: [] Val[entine] Simmes for Edward Blount [], OCLC 946730821:
      As salutations, reverences, or conges, by which some doe often purchase the honour, (but wrongfully) to be humble, lowly, and courteous [].
    • 1620 Mayflower Compact
      [] a voyage to plant yͤ first colonie in yͤ Northerne parts of Virginia, doe by these presents solemnly & mutualy in yͤ presence of God []

Etymology 3Edit

AdverbEdit

doe (not comparable)

  1. (African-American Vernacular, MLE) though

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

VerbEdit

doe

  1. first-person singular present indicative of doen
  2. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of doen
  3. imperative of doen

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Dutch doe.

AdverbEdit

doe

  1. (now dialectal) Alternative form of toen.

ConjunctionEdit

doe

  1. (now dialectal) Alternative form of toen.

AnagramsEdit


LimburgishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch du, from Old Dutch thū, from Proto-West Germanic *þū, from Proto-Germanic *þū.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

doe

  1. thou, you (singular)

DeclensionEdit


LinduEdit

NounEdit

doe

  1. end; tip

Middle DutchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Dutch thuo, related to thie (that one).

AdverbEdit

doe

  1. then, at that time, at the time
  2. then, after that
Alternative formsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Dutch: toen
  • Limburgish: doe

ConjunctionEdit

doe

  1. when, at the time that
Alternative formsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

doe

  1. inflection of doen:
    1. first-person singular present indicative
    2. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    3. singular imperative

Further readingEdit


Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *dowsants.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

döe f (genitive doat, nominative plural doit)

  1. upper arm

InflectionEdit

Feminine nt-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative doe doitL doit
Vocative doe doitL doitea
Accusative doitN doitL doitea
Genitive doat doatL doatN
Dative doitL doitib doitib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
doe doe
pronounced with /ð(ʲ)-/
ndoe
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009), “*dowsant-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, pages 103-104

Further readingEdit


PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

 

VerbEdit

doe

  1. inflection of doar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

See ddoe (yesterday)

AdverbEdit

doe

  1. yesterday

West FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

doe

  1. then, at that time (which is presumably in the past)
    Doe, saken wienen net lykas no.
    Then, things were not like now.

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • doe”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011