Middle IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish do·icc.

VerbEdit

do·icc

  1. to come (move from further away to nearer to)
    • c. 1000, The Tale of Mac Da Thó's Pig, section 1:
      Tancas o Ailill ocus o Meidb do chungid in chon. I n‑oen uair dana tancatar ocus techta Conchobair mic Nessa do chungid in chon chetna.
      People came from Ailill and from Medb to ask for the dog. At the same time, then, messengers came also from Conchobar Mac Nessa to ask for the same dog.

ConjugationEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Irish: tig
  • Scottish Gaelic: thig
  • Manx: çheet

MutationEdit

Middle Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
do··icc unchanged do··n-icc
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From to- +‎ ·icc.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

do·icc (prototonic ·ticc, verbal noun tíchtu or tiacht)

  1. (transitive) to come to, approach
  2. (intransitive) to come (move from further away to nearer to)
    Synonym: do·tét

Usage notesEdit

In the older language, this verb is only transitive, and the intransitive sense is supplied by do·tét. In the later language, do·icc replaces do·tét in the intransitive sense.

ConjugationEdit

DescendantsEdit

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
do·icc unchanged do·n-icc
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit