EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English, from Old English tō-, te- (apart, away), from Proto-Germanic *twiz- (apart, in two), from Proto-Indo-European *dis- (apart, asunder), *dwis- (two-ways, in twain). Cognate with Dutch toe-, te-, German zu-, zer-, Latin dis- (apart). More at dis-.

PrefixEdit

to-

  1. (no longer productive except dialectally) Prefix meaning "apart", "away", "asunder", "in pieces", or expressing separation, negation, or intensity[1].
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English to (to), from Old English (to). More at to.

PrefixEdit

to-

  1. (rare, dialectal or no longer productive) Particle ocurring in various words meaning to, toward, at, or on (this).
    today
    tomorrow
    tonight
    together
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Whitney, The Century dictionary and cyclopedia, to-

See alsoEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *twiz-, from Proto-Indo-European *dwis-. Cognate with Old Frisian ti-, te-, Old Saxon te-, Old High German zi-, zir-, zar-, zur- (German zer-), Gothic 𐌳𐌹𐍃- (dis-), and with Latin dis-.

PronunciationEdit

PrefixEdit

tō-

  1. (as unstressed te-, ti- or stressed tō-) forming (mainly) verbs from verbs, with a sense of ‘in pieces, apart, asunder’, or with intensive force
    tefeallan, tōfeallan (to fall apart)
    titwǣman, tōtwǣman (to separate)
    tetorfian, tōtorfian (to toss about)
  2. (stressed prefix) used to form substantives from other nouns
    tōtalu (reputation)
    tōsprǣċ (conversation)

Usage notesEdit

  • The prefix has two basic forms: stressed (tō-) and unstressed (te-, ti-). Originally, the unstressed formed verbs, and the stressed formed other derivatives (nouns, adverbs, etc). This distinction was blurred in later Old English where the stressed form came to be used for both

Old IrishEdit

PrefixEdit

to-

  1. to, towards

Usage notesEdit

Generally appears as do- in pretonic position, thus being merged with di- in that position.

Derived termsEdit


Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *tō, *ta (to), from Proto-Indo-European *de, *do (to). A same use of this preposition as a prefix for verbs is found in Old English (to- (to)), Old High German (zuo- (to)), Dutch (toe- (to)), German (zu- (to)) and modern English (particle "to" in "kneel to")

PrefixEdit

to-

  1. Creates words with a sense of ‘towards, to, against’
    tōdōn (to add ; to close)
    tōheftian (to fix)
    tōhlinon (to lean against)
    tōhnēgian (to neigh towards)
    tōrūnon (to whisper)
    tōsprekan (to speak with, discuss, talk to)
    tōstōtan (to push, thrust)
    tōward (future)
    tōwardes (near)
    tōwardig (near)
    tōwendian (to turn towards)

Derived termsEdit

Category Old Saxon words prefixed with to- not found
Last modified on 3 April 2014, at 19:10