domicile

EnglishEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English domicelle, domicylie, from Middle French domicile and directly from Latin domicilium.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈdɒm.ɪ.saɪl/
    • (file)
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈdɑ.mɪ.saɪl/, /ˈdɑ.mɪ.sɪl/

NounEdit

domicile (plural domiciles)

  1. (formal) A home or residence.
    The call to jury duty was sent to my legal domicile; too bad I was on vacation at the time.
  2. (law) A residence at a particular place accompanied with an intention to remain there for an unlimited time; a residence accepted as a final abode.
    • 1838, Reports of Cases Decided in the Supreme Courts of Scotland:
      the status of marriage has been indelibly fixed by the English celebration; and by this decision, her domicile, as a married woman, has been held to be that of her husband

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

domicile (third-person singular simple present domiciles, present participle domiciling, simple past and past participle domiciled)

  1. To have a domicile in a particular place.
    The answer depends on which state he was domiciled in at his death.

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin domicilium.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

domicile m (plural domiciles)

  1. domicile

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit