See also: Planet, planèt, and plånet

English edit

 
Planets of the Solar System

Etymology edit

From Middle English planete, from Old French planete, from Latin planeta, planetes, from Ancient Greek πλανήτης (planḗtēs, wanderer) (ellipsis of πλάνητες ἀστέρες (plánētes astéres, wandering stars).), from Ancient Greek πλανάω (planáō, wander about, stray), of unknown origin. Cognate with Latin pālor (wander about, stray), Old Norse flana (to rush about), and Norwegian flanta (to wander about). More at flaunt.

Perhaps it is from a nasalized form of Proto-Indo-European *pleh₂- (flat, broad) on the notion of "spread out", "but the semantics are highly problematic", according to Beekes, who notes the similarity of meaning to πλάζω (plázō, to make devious, repel, dissuade from the right path, bewilder), but adds, "it is hard to think of a formal connection".

So called because they have apparent motion, unlike the "fixed" stars. Originally including also the moon and sun but not the Earth; modern scientific sense of "world that orbits a star" is from 1630s in English. The Greek word is an enlarged form of πλάνης (plánēs, who wanders around, wanderer), also "wandering star, planet", in medicine "unstable temperature."

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

planet (plural planets)

  1. (now historical or astrology) Each of the seven major bodies which move relative to the fixed stars in the night sky—the Moon, Mercury, Venus, the Sun, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn. [from 14thc.]
    • 1603, Michel de Montaigne, chapter 12, in John Florio, transl., The Essayes [], book II, London: [] Val[entine] Simmes for Edward Blount [], →OCLC, page 260:
      Be they not dreames of humane vanity, [] to make of our knowne earth a bright shining planet [translating astre]?
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, Tom Jones, Folio Society, published 1973, page 288:
      The moon [] began to rise from her bed, where she had slumbered away the day, in order to sit up all night. Jones had not travelled far before he paid his compliments to that beautiful planet, and, turning to his companion, asked him if he had ever beheld so delicious an evening?
    • 1971, Keith Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic, Folio Society, published 2012, page 361:
      Another of Boehme's followers, the Welshman Morgan Llwyd, also believed that the seven planets could be found within man.
  2. (astronomy) A body which is massive enough to be in hydrostatic equilibrium (generally resulting in being an ellipsoid) but not enough to attain nuclear fusion and, in IAU usage, which directly orbits a star (or star cluster) and dominates the region of its orbit; specifically, in the case of the Solar system, the eight major bodies of Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. [from 2006]
    Synonyms: wandering star, wanderstar
    Hypernym: planemo (in IAU usage)
    Hyponyms: binary planet, Blue Planet, carbide planet, carbon planet, classical planet, diamond planet, double planet, dual planet, dwarf planet (in non-IAU usage), exoplanet, extrasolar planet, free-floating planet (in non-IAU usage), gas giant, giant planet, hycean planet, ice giant, inferior planet, inner planet, interstellar planet (in non-IAU usage), major planet, mesoplanet, minor planet (in non-IAU usage), outer planet, Planet Earth, primary planet (in non-IAU usage), Red Planet, rogue planet (in non-IAU usage), satellite planet (in non-IAU usage), silicate planet, silicon planet, supergiant planet, superior planet, superplanet, terrestrial planet, water planet
    Coordinate terms: brown dwarf, sub-brown dwarf
    • 1640, John Wilkins, A Discovrse concerning a New Planet. Tending to prove, That 'tis probable our Earth is one of the Planets, title:
      A Discovrse concerning a New Planet. Tending to prove, That 'tis probable our Earth is one of the Planets
    • 2006 December 22, Alok Jha, The Guardian:
      Their decision will force a rewrite of science textbooks because the solar system is now a place with eight planets and three newly defined "dwarf planets"—a new category of object that includes Pluto.
    • 2009 December 1st, Keiichi Wada, Yusuke Tsukamoto, Eiichiro Kokubo, “Planet Formation around Supermassive Black Holes in the Active Galactic Nuclei”, in The Astrophysical Journal, volume 886, number 2, article 107:
  3. construed with the or this: synonym of Earth.
    • 1907 August, Robert W[illiam] Chambers, chapter VIII, in The Younger Set, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, →OCLC:
      "My tastes," he said, still smiling, "incline me to the garishly sunlit side of this planet." And, to tease her and arouse her to combat: "I prefer a farandole to a nocturne; I'd rather have a painting than an etching; Mr. Whistler bores me with his monochromatic mud; I don't like dull colours, dull sounds, dull intellects; []."
    • 2013 June 7, David Simpson, “Fantasy of navigation”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 188, number 26, page 36:
      It is tempting to speculate about the incentives or compulsions that might explain why anyone would take to the skies in [the] basket [of a balloon]: []; perhaps to moralise on the oneness or fragility of the planet, or to see humanity for the small and circumscribed thing that it is; [].

Usage notes edit

The term planet originally meant any star which wandered across the sky, and generally included comets and the Sun and Moon. With the Copernican revolution, the Earth was recognized as a planet, and the Sun was seen to be fundamentally different. The Galilean satellites of Jupiter were at first called planets (satellite planets), but later reclassified along with the Moon. The first asteroids were also considered to be planets, but were reclassified when it was realized that there were a great many of them, crossing each other's orbits, in a zone where only a single planet had been expected. Likewise, Pluto was found where an outer planet had been expected, but doubts were raised when it turned out to cross Neptune's orbit and to be much smaller than the expectation required. When Eris, an outer body more massive than Pluto, was discovered, the International Astronomical Union (IAU) officially defined the word planet as above. However, a significant number of astronomers reject the IAU definition, especially in the field of planetary geology. Some are of the opinion that orbital parameters should be irrelevant, and that either any equilibrium (ellipsoidal) body in direct orbit around a star is a planet (there are likely at least a dozen such bodies in the Solar system) or that any equilibrium body at all is a planet, thus re-accepting the Moon, the Galilean satellites and other large moons as planets, as well as rogue planets.

Hypernyms edit

Hyponyms edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Translations edit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also edit

References edit

Anagrams edit

Albanian edit

 
Albanian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sq

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

planet m (plural planete, definite planeti, definite plural planetet)

  1. planet

Declension edit

Azerbaijani edit

Other scripts
Cyrillic планет
Abjad پلانئت

Etymology edit

Internationalism; ultimately from Latin planēta and Ancient Greek πλανήτης (planḗtēs, wanderer, planet).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [pɫɑˈnet]
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: pla‧net

Noun edit

planet (definite accusative planeti, plural planetlər)

  1. (astronomy) planet
    Synonym: səyyarə

Declension edit

    Declension of planet
singular plural
nominative planet
planetlər
definite accusative planeti
planetləri
dative planetə
planetlərə
locative planetdə
planetlərdə
ablative planetdən
planetlərdən
definite genitive planetin
planetlərin
    Possessive forms of planet
nominative
singular plural
mənim (my) planetim planetlərim
sənin (your) planetin planetlərin
onun (his/her/its) planeti planetləri
bizim (our) planetimiz planetlərimiz
sizin (your) planetiniz planetləriniz
onların (their) planeti or planetləri planetləri
accusative
singular plural
mənim (my) planetimi planetlərimi
sənin (your) planetini planetlərini
onun (his/her/its) planetini planetlərini
bizim (our) planetimizi planetlərimizi
sizin (your) planetinizi planetlərinizi
onların (their) planetini or planetlərini planetlərini
dative
singular plural
mənim (my) planetimə planetlərimə
sənin (your) planetinə planetlərinə
onun (his/her/its) planetinə planetlərinə
bizim (our) planetimizə planetlərimizə
sizin (your) planetinizə planetlərinizə
onların (their) planetinə or planetlərinə planetlərinə
locative
singular plural
mənim (my) planetimdə planetlərimdə
sənin (your) planetində planetlərində
onun (his/her/its) planetində planetlərində
bizim (our) planetimizdə planetlərimizdə
sizin (your) planetinizdə planetlərinizdə
onların (their) planetində or planetlərində planetlərində
ablative
singular plural
mənim (my) planetimdən planetlərimdən
sənin (your) planetindən planetlərindən
onun (his/her/its) planetindən planetlərindən
bizim (our) planetimizdən planetlərimizdən
sizin (your) planetinizdən planetlərinizdən
onların (their) planetindən or planetlərindən planetlərindən
genitive
singular plural
mənim (my) planetimin planetlərimin
sənin (your) planetinin planetlərinin
onun (his/her/its) planetinin planetlərinin
bizim (our) planetimizin planetlərimizin
sizin (your) planetinizin planetlərinizin
onların (their) planetinin or planetlərinin planetlərinin

Derived terms edit

Danish edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun edit

planet c (singular definite planeten, plural indefinite planeter)

  1. (astronomy) a planet

Inflection edit

Derived terms edit

German edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

planet

  1. second-person plural subjunctive I of planen

Middle English edit

Noun edit

planet

  1. Alternative form of planete (planet)

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse planéta, from Latin planēta, from Ancient Greek πλανήτης (planḗtēs, wanderer).

Noun edit

planet m (definite singular planeten, indefinite plural planeter, definite plural planetene)

  1. a planet

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Norse planéta, from Latin planēta, from Ancient Greek πλανήτης (planḗtēs, wanderer).

Noun edit

planet m (definite singular planeten, indefinite plural planetar, definite plural planetane)

  1. a planet
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Noun edit

planet n

  1. definite singular of plan

References edit

Polish edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

planet f

  1. genitive plural of planeta

Romanian edit

Noun edit

planet m (plural planeți)

  1. Alternative form of planetă

Declension edit

Romansch edit

Noun edit

planet m (plural planets)

  1. (astronomy, astrology) planet

Serbo-Croatian edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /plǎneːt/
  • Hyphenation: pla‧net

Noun edit

plànēt m (Cyrillic spelling пла̀не̄т)

  1. (usually Croatia) planet

Declension edit

Slovene edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

planẹ̑t m inan

  1. (astronomy) planet

Inflection edit

 
The diacritics used in this section of the entry are non-tonal. If you are a native tonal speaker, please help by adding the tonal marks.
Masculine inan., hard o-stem
nom. sing. planét
gen. sing. planéta
singular dual plural
nominative
(imenovȃlnik)
planét planéta planéti
genitive
(rodȋlnik)
planéta planétov planétov
dative
(dajȃlnik)
planétu planétoma planétom
accusative
(tožȋlnik)
planét planéta planéte
locative
(mẹ̑stnik)
planétu planétih planétih
instrumental
(orọ̑dnik)
planétom planétoma planéti

Derived terms edit

See also edit

Swedish edit

Etymology 1 edit

Ultimately from Ancient Greek πλανήτης (planḗtēs).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

planet c

  1. (astronomy) planet
Declension edit
Declension of planet 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative planet planeten planeter planeterna
Genitive planets planetens planeters planeternas

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun edit

planet

  1. definite singular of plan

Turkish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French planète.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /pɫaˈnet/
  • Hyphenation: pla‧net

Noun edit

planet (definite accusative planeti, plural planetler)

  1. (astronomy, rare) planet
    Synonym: gezegen

Declension edit

Inflection
Nominative planet
Definite accusative planeti
Singular Plural
Nominative planet planetler
Definite accusative planeti planetleri
Dative planete planetlere
Locative planette planetlerde
Ablative planetten planetlerden
Genitive planetin planetlerin
Possessive forms
Nominative
Singular Plural
1st singular planetim planetlerim
2nd singular planetin planetlerin
3rd singular planeti planetleri
1st plural planetimiz planetlerimiz
2nd plural planetiniz planetleriniz
3rd plural planetleri planetleri
Definite accusative
Singular Plural
1st singular planetimi planetlerimi
2nd singular planetini planetlerini
3rd singular planetini planetlerini
1st plural planetimizi planetlerimizi
2nd plural planetinizi planetlerinizi
3rd plural planetlerini planetlerini
Dative
Singular Plural
1st singular planetime planetlerime
2nd singular planetine planetlerine
3rd singular planetine planetlerine
1st plural planetimize planetlerimize
2nd plural planetinize planetlerinize
3rd plural planetlerine planetlerine
Locative
Singular Plural
1st singular planetimde planetlerimde
2nd singular planetinde planetlerinde
3rd singular planetinde planetlerinde
1st plural planetimizde planetlerimizde
2nd plural planetinizde planetlerinizde
3rd plural planetlerinde planetlerinde
Ablative
Singular Plural
1st singular planetimden planetlerimden
2nd singular planetinden planetlerinden
3rd singular planetinden planetlerinden
1st plural planetimizden planetlerimizden
2nd plural planetinizden planetlerinizden
3rd plural planetlerinden planetlerinden
Genitive
Singular Plural
1st singular planetimin planetlerimin
2nd singular planetinin planetlerinin
3rd singular planetinin planetlerinin
1st plural planetimizin planetlerimizin
2nd plural planetinizin planetlerinizin
3rd plural planetlerinin planetlerinin