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AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dracō, from Ancient Greek δράκων (drákōn). Compare Megleno-Romanian and Daco-Romanian drac.

NounEdit

drac m (plural drats)

  1. devil

See alsoEdit


CatalanEdit

 
Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ca

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan drac (compare Occitan drac), from Latin dracō (compare Italian and Spanish drago, Romanian drac), from Ancient Greek δράκων (drákōn). Compare also Catalan dragó, from the accusative of the Latin.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

drac m (plural dracs)

  1. dragon
  2. (heraldry) dragon (stylised representation)

Related termsEdit


FrenchEdit

 
drac de Beaucaire

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Occitan drac, from Latin dracō. Compare the inherited doublet dragon.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

drac m (plural dracs)

  1. (mythology) A type of mythological creature associated with the dangers of water.

Further readingEdit


Megleno-RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dracō, from Ancient Greek δράκων (drákōn). Compare Aromanian and Daco-Romanian drac.

NounEdit

drac m

  1. devil

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dracō (dragon), from Ancient Greek δράκων (drákōn). Word has changed meaning from “dragon”, balaur in Romanian, to “devil” (one of the meanings in Ecclesiastical Latin was that of “Devil”, however). Compare also Catalan and Occitan drac and the derived French drac. Doublet of Romanian dragon, borrowed from French.

NounEdit

drac m (plural draci)

  1. devil

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: Dracula