See also: Emmet and em mệt

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English emete, from Old English ǣmete, (bef. 12c) Doublet of ant.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

emmet (plural emmets)

  1. (dialectal or archaic) An ant.
    • 1621, Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy, Oxford: Printed by Iohn Lichfield and Iames Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 216894069:
      , New York Review of Books, 2001, p.47:
      He told him that he saw a vast multitude and a promiscuous, their habitations like molehills, the men as emmets […].
    • 1789, William Blake, Songs of Innocence, A Dream:
      Once a dream did weave a shade / O'er my angel-guarded bed / That an emmet lost its way / Where on grass methought I lay.
    • 1814, William Wordsworth, The Excursion, IV.430:
      [A benignity that] to the emmet gives / Her foresight, and intelligence that makes / The tiny creatures strong by social league.
    • 1993, Anthony Burgess, A Dead Man in Deptford:
      We are scurrying emmets or pismires with our sad little comedies.
  2. (Cornwall, pejorative) A tourist.

See alsoEdit