EnglishEdit

 
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A group of ants.

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English ampte, amte, emete, amete, from Old English ǣmette (ant), from Proto-West Germanic *āmaitijā (literally biting-thing, cutter), from Proto-Germanic *ē- (off, away) + *maitaną (to cut), from Proto-Indo-European *mai- (to cut). Cognate with Scots emmot (ant), dialectal Dutch emt, empt (ant), German Ameise and Emse (ant). See also emmet.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ant (plural ants)

  1. Any of various insects in the family Formicidae in the order Hymenoptera, typically living in large colonies composed almost entirely of flightless females.
    • 2013 July 26, Nick Miroff, “Mexico gets a taste for eating insects [] ”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 7, page 32:
      The San Juan market is Mexico City's most famous deli of exotic meats, where an adventurous shopper can hunt down hard-to-find critters [] . But the priciest items in the market aren't the armadillo steaks or even the bluefin tuna. That would be the frozen chicatanas – giant winged ants – at around $500 a kilo.
  2. (Internet) A Web spider.

SynonymsEdit

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

ant (third-person singular simple present ants, present participle anting, simple past and past participle anted)

  1. (ornithology) To rub insects, especially ants, on one's body, perhaps to control parasites or clean feathers.
    • 1974, “Relationship of anting and sunbathing to molting in wild birds”, in The Auk[2], volume 91, page 538:
      Wild birds tend to ant and sunbathe most frequently during periods of high humidity, particularly right after heavy or prolonged rainfall in summer.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Joan Beal (2002) English Pronunciation in the Eighteenth Century: Thomas Spence's Grand Repository of the English Language[1], Oxford University Press, →ISBN, page 109

AnagramsEdit


BretonEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

ant m

  1. furrow

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ant m (plural ants)

  1. elk, moose

Crimean TatarEdit

NounEdit

ant

  1. oath

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Mirjejev, V. A.; Usejinov, S. M. (2002) Ukrajinsʹko-krymsʹkotatarsʹkyj slovnyk [Ukrainian – Crimean Tatar Dictionary]‎[3], Simferopol: Dolya, →ISBN

EgyptianEdit

RomanizationEdit

ant

  1. Manuel de Codage transliteration of ꜥnt.

Haitian CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French entre (between).

PrepositionEdit

ant

  1. between

LithuanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

añt (with genitive)

  1. on

MeroiticEdit

RomanizationEdit

ant

  1. Romanization of 𐦠𐦩𐦴

Middle WelshEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ant

  1. third-person plural present indicative of mynet

Norwegian BokmålEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ant

  1. past participle of ane
  2. past participle common of ane
  3. past participle neuter of ane

AnagramsEdit


TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Turkic *Ānt (oath). Cognate with Old Turkic 𐰦(nt), Azerbaijani and, etc.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈant/
  • Hyphenation: ant

NounEdit

ant (definite accusative andı, plural antlar)

  1. oath

SynonymsEdit


TurkmenEdit

NounEdit

ant (definite accusative ?, plural ?)

  1. oath

DeclensionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


VilamovianEdit

 
ant

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ȧnt f (plural anta)

  1. duck