EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French exequies, from Latin exsequiās, accusative of exsequiæ (train of followers).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

exequy (plural exequys or exequies)

  1. (obsolete, now only in plural) Funeral rites.
    • c. 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 1, Act III, Scene 2,[1]
      But yet, before we go, let’s not forget
      The noble Duke of Bedford late deceased,
      But see his exequies fulfill’d in Rouen:
    • 1594, Christopher Marlowe, Edward II, London: William Jones,[2]
      EDWARD. Whether goes my Lord of Couentrie so fast?
      BISHOP. To celebrate your fathers exequies,
    • 1609, Douay–Rheims Bible, Old Testament, volume I (1635 reprint), “The Second Book of Samuel, which we cal the Second of Kings.”, chapter i, marginal note b, page 573:
      Exequies of Saul obſerued with mourning weeping and faſting.
    • 1658, Thomas Browne, Urne-Burial, London: Henry Brome, p. 13,[3]
      More serious conjectures finde some examples of sepulture in Elephants, Cranes, the Sepulchrall Cells of Pismires and practice of Bees; which civill society carrieth out their dead, and hath exequies, if not interrments.
    • 2000, Kate Atkinson, Emotionally Weird, p. 191:
      "We were accelerating along the Perth Road at a speed much faster than is normally associated with exequies and therefore causing considerable consternation amongst our fellow motorists."

Alternative formsEdit