funeral

EnglishEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

[1437] Borrowed from Middle French funerailles pl (funeral rites), from Medieval Latin fūnerālia (funeral rites), originally neuter plural of Late Latin fūnerālis (having to do with a funeral), from Latin fūnus (funeral, death, corpse), origin unknown, perhaps ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *dʰew- (to die). Singular and plural used interchangeably in English until circa 1700. The adjective funereal is first attested 1725, by influence of Middle French funerail, from Latin funereus, from funus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

funeral (plural funerals)

  1. A ceremony to honour and remember a deceased person. Often distinguished from a memorial service by the presence of the body of the deceased.
    Many mourners turned up at the local artist's funeral to pay homage.
    • 1661, Giles Collier, The Taking Away of Righteous & Merciful Persons Must Be Taken to Heart, Applied in a Sermon at the Funeralls of Mris Anne-Mary Child. [], Oxford: [] William Hall:
      The taking Away of Righteous & Merciful Perſons muſt be taken to Heart, APPLIED IN A SERMON AT THE FUNERALLS OF Mris ANNE-MARY CHILD. Wife of THOMAS CHILD Eſq. of North-wick in the Pariſh of Blockley. Worceſter-ſhire. [] TO THE Exemplarily Vertuous Gentle-woman, his much honoured friend, Mrs ANNE CHILD, Eldeſt daughter of THOMAS CHILD of Northwicke Eſquire. AS I mean not an exerciſe for your modeſty by a flattering Epiſtle, ſo neither doe I intend the renewing of your ſorrows, by preſenting you with the plaine Sermon preach’t at the funerals of your bleſſed Mother.
  2. (dated, chiefly in the plural) A funeral sermon.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

 
A funeral procession in Peru

funeral (not comparable)

  1. (uncommon) Alternative form of funereal
    • 1852, Benson John Lossing, The Pictorial Field-book of the Revolution, page 367:
      All was funeral gloom and hope never whispered its cheering promises there.
    • 1869, William Carleton, Tubber Derg: Or, The Red Well, page 166:
      Indeed I felt it altogether beautiful; and, as the "dying day-hymn stole aloft," the dim sun-beams fell, through a vista of naked motionless trees, upon the coffin, which was borne with a slower and more funeral pace than before, in a manner that threw a solemn and visionary light upon the whole procession.
    • 1888, Plutarch's Lives: The Translation Called Dryden's - Volume 5, page 153:
      There was something dramatic and theatrical in the very funeral ceremonies with which Demetrius was honored.
    • 1998, Lisa M. Klein, The Exemplary Sidney and the Elizabethan Sonneteer, page 15:
      The very funeral pageantry disguised behind-the-scenes struggles for control over Sidney's image.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • funeral in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • funeral at OneLook Dictionary Search

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin fūnerālis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

funeral (masculine and feminine plural funerals)

  1. funerary, funeral
    Synonyms: funerari, fúnebre

NounEdit

funeral m (plural funerals)

  1. (often in the plural) funeral (ceremony)

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


GalicianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!
  • Hyphenation: fu‧ne‧ral

NounEdit

funeral m (plural funerais)

  1. funeral (ceremony to honour and bury a deceased person)

PiedmonteseEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

funeral m

  1. funeral

Related termsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin fūnerālis, from Latin funus.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): (Brazil) /fu.neˈɾaw/, [fu.neˈɾaʊ̯]
  • IPA(key): (Portugal) /fu.nɨˈɾal/, [fu.nɨˈɾaɫ]

  • Hyphenation: fu‧ne‧ral

NounEdit

funeral m (plural funerais)

  1. funeral (ceremony to honour and bury a deceased person)

Usage notesEdit

In Portuguese, it is more common to refer to the wake (velório) than to the funeral.

AdjectiveEdit

funeral m or f (plural funerais, comparable)

  1. funeral; funerary (relating to a funeral)
    Synonyms: fúnebre, funerário
  2. (literary) funeral; gloomy; dreary
    Synonyms: fúnebre, funesto, lúgubre

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin fūnerālis, from Latin funus.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /funeˈɾal/, [fu.neˈɾal]
  • Hyphenation: fu‧ne‧ral

AdjectiveEdit

funeral (plural funerales)

  1. funerary, funeral
    Synonyms: funerario, fúnebre

NounEdit

funeral m (plural funerales)

  1. (often in the plural) funeral (ceremony)

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit