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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

A variant of extravert, popularized in psychology by Phyllis Blanchard's 1918 "Psycho-Analytic Study of August Comte", equivalent to extro- +‎ vert.

Pronunciation 1Edit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɛkstɹəvəːt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɛkstɹəˌvəɹt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)t

NounEdit

extrovert (plural extroverts)

  1. (informal psychology) An extroverted person: one who is outgoing, sociable, and concerned with outer affairs.
    • 1918 April, Phyllis Blanchard, "A Psycho-Analytic Study of August Comte", American Journal of Psychology, p. 163:
      In order to understand the marked contract between Comte's mental attitude during his early years and that of his later life, we must keep in mind Jung's hypothesis of the two psychological types, the introvert and extrovert,—the thinking type and the feeling type.
Usage notesEdit

Technical papers in psychology overwhelmingly prefer extravert, the variant used by Carl Jung, although the spelling extrovert is more common in general use.

AntonymsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

extrovert (comparative more extrovert, superlative most extrovert)

  1. (informal psychology) Alternative form of extroverted: outgoing.

Pronunciation 2Edit

VerbEdit

extrovert (third-person singular simple present extroverts, present participle extroverting, simple past and past participle extroverted)

  1. (transitive) To turn or thrust outwards.
    • 1671, John Webster, Metallographia, p. 197:
      The external and combustible Sulphur... is... protruded and extroverted.

ReferencesEdit


CzechEdit

NounEdit

extrovert m

  1. (psychology) extrovert

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit