EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately from Latin facētus; perhaps via Italian faceto.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

facete (comparative more facete, superlative most facete)

  1. (archaic) Facetious.
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 54573970, partition I, section 2, member 4, subsection iv:
      Adrian the sixth pope [] gave command that statue should be demolished and burned, the ashes flung into the River Tiber, and had done it forthwith, had not Lodovicus Suessanus, a facete companion, dissuaded him to the contrary […].

Derived termsEdit


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

facete f pl

  1. Feminine plural of adjective faceto.

LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

facēte

  1. vocative masculine singular of facētus

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

facete

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of facetar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of facetar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of facetar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of facetar