farther

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Variant of further.[1]

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

farther

  1. Alternative form of further. (See also the usage notes at further.)
    • 1813: Pride & Prejudice
      The necessity must be obeyed, and farther apology would be absurd.

AdverbEdit

farther

  1. Alternative form of further. (See also the usage notes at further.)
    • 1748. David Hume. Enquiries concerning the human understanding and concerning the principles of moral. London: Oxford University Press, 1973. § 5.
      But as the matter is often carried farther, even to the absolute rejecting of all profound reasonings, or what is commonly called metaphysics, we shall now proceed to consider what can reasonably be pleaded in their behalf.

VerbEdit

farther (third-person singular simple present farthers, present participle farthering, simple past and past participle farthered)

  1. (uncommon or old-fashioned) Alternative form of further.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ farther” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2020.