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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English feet, fet, from Old English fēt, from Proto-Germanic *fōtiz, from Proto-Indo-European *pódes, nominative plural of *pṓds (foot). Cognate with Saterland Frisian Fäite (feet), West Frisian fiet (feet), German Füße (feet), Danish fødder (feet), Swedish fötter (feet), Faroese føtur (feet), Icelandic fætur (feet).

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: fēt, IPA(key): /fiːt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːt
  • Homophone: feat

NounEdit

feet

  1. plural form of foot.
    • 1913, Mrs. [Marie] Belloc Lowndes, chapter II, in The Lodger, London: Methuen, OCLC 7780546; republished in Novels of Mystery: The Lodger; The Story of Ivy; What Really Happened, New York, N.Y.: Longmans, Green and Co., 55 Fifth Avenue, [1933], OCLC 2666860, page 0091:
      There was a neat hat-and-umbrella stand, and the stranger's weary feet fell soft on a good, serviceable dark-red drugget, which matched in colour the flock-paper on the walls.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 14, in The China Governess[1]:
      Just under the ceiling there were three lunette windows, heavily barred and blacked out in the normal way by centuries of grime. Their bases were on a level with the pavement outside, a narrow way which was several feet lower than the road behind the house.

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

feet

  1. (obsolete) Fact; performance; feat.

AnagramsEdit


LuxembourgishEdit

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

feet

  1. plural of fot

Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

feet n

  1. definite singular of fe (Etymology 2)

Norwegian NynorskEdit

NounEdit

feet n

  1. definite singular of fe (Etymology 2)