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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English feet, fet, from Old English fēt, from Proto-Germanic *fōtiz, from Proto-Indo-European *pódes, nominative plural of *pṓds (foot). Cognate with Saterland Frisian Fäite (feet), West Frisian fiet (feet), German Füße (feet), Danish fødder (feet), Swedish fötter (feet), Faroese føtur (feet), Icelandic fætur (feet).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

feet

  1. plural form of foot.
    • 1913, Mrs. [Marie] Belloc Lowndes, chapter II, in The Lodger, London: Methuen, OCLC 7780546; republished in Novels of Mystery: The Lodger; The Story of Ivy; What Really Happened, New York, N.Y.: Longmans, Green and Co., 55 Fifth Avenue, [1933], OCLC 2666860, page 0091:
      There was a neat hat-and-umbrella stand, and the stranger's weary feet fell soft on a good, serviceable dark-red drugget, which matched in colour the flock-paper on the walls.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 14, in The China Governess[1]:
      Just under the ceiling there were three lunette windows, heavily barred and blacked out in the normal way by centuries of grime. Their bases were on a level with the pavement outside, a narrow way which was several feet lower than the road behind the house.

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

feet

  1. (obsolete) Fact; performance; feat.

AnagramsEdit


LuxembourgishEdit

Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

feet n

  1. definite singular of fe (Etymology 2)

Norwegian NynorskEdit

NounEdit

feet n

  1. definite singular of fe (Etymology 2)