See also: Fete, fête, fêté, fetĕ, and fețe

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French fête. Doublet of feast and fiesta.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /feɪt/, /fɛt/
    • (file)
  • AHD: /fāt/, /fet/
  • Homophones: fate
  • Rhymes: -eɪt, -ɛt

NounEdit

fete (plural fetes)

  1. A festival open to the public, the proceeds from which are often given to charity.
    • 1991, Treasure Hunting, Treasure Hunting Publications:
      The final fete of the year was held at the Plymouth Hoe on 20 July, where fine weather and crowds of people ensured much support for local charities and boosted club finds.
  2. A feast, celebration or carnival.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

fete (third-person singular simple present fetes, present participle feting, simple past and past participle feted)

  1. (transitive, usually in the passive) To celebrate (a person).
    Synonym: celebrate
    • 1992, Today, News Group Newspapers Ltd:
      Danielle Salamon was also four when she was feted as a musical genius in 1953.
    • 2007 April 6, Mike Barnes, “Is this the hardest-working man in music?”, in The Guardian[1]:
      Saxophonist Pete Wareham, his friend and collaborator in Polar Bear and the critically feted groups Acoustic Ladyland and Fulborn Teversham, soon punctures that idea.
    • 2018 April 27, William Cook, “Are Macron and Merkel playing good cop, bad cop with Trump?”, in The Spectator:
      For three days Emmanuel Macron was wooed and fêted by Donald Trump, treated to marching bands and banquets.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fēte

  1. vocative masculine singular of fētus

NeapolitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin fēteō

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

fete

  1. to smell bad, to stink

Norwegian BokmålEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fete

  1. definite singular of fet
  2. plural of fet

RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fete f pl

  1. plural of fată

SwedishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fete

  1. absolute definite natural masculine singular of fet.