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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Circa 1600, England. From fiddlestick, from the late Middle English fidillstyk (violin bow).

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

fiddlesticks

  1. (euphemistic) Nonsense! Expresses dismissal or disdain.
    Fiddlesticks! It's nothing but smoke and mirrors!
    • 1701, Farquhar, George, Sir Harry Wildair, act 4, scene 2; republished in The Dramatic Works of George Farquhar, volume 1, London: John C. Nimmo, 1892, page 295:
      Golden pleasures! golden fiddlesticks!—What d'ye tell me of your canting stuff?
    • 1840, Miles, Henry Downes, Dick Turpin:
      "Taken the veil—taken fiddlesticks!" said the old man, merrily; "why she lives near Lincoln, is married to a substantial man, the junior partner of one of the wealthiest bankers in the county []
    • 1923 October 6, Christie, Agatha, “The Case of the Veiled Lady”, in The Sketch, number 1601:
      'Safe? Fiddlesticks! There is no safe. Mr Lavington is an intelligent man. You will see, he will have devised a hiding-place much more intelligent than a safe. A safe is the first thing everyone looks for.'
  2. (euphemistic) Darn! Expresses mild dismay or annoyance.
    Oh, fiddlesticks! I locked my keys in the car.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

fiddlesticks

  1. plural of fiddlestick

ReferencesEdit

  • fiddlestick (n.)” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2019, retrieved 9 June 2019.