EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Alteration of damn

AdjectiveEdit

darn (not comparable)

  1. (euphemistic) Damn.
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AdverbEdit

darn (not comparable)

  1. (degree, euphemistic) Damned.

InterjectionEdit

darn

  1. (euphemistic) Damn.
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VerbEdit

darn (third-person singular simple present darns, present participle darning, simple past and past participle darned)

  1. (transitive) Euphemism of damn.
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Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English dernen (to keep secret, hide, conceal (a hole)), from Old English diernan (to hide, conceal), from dierne (secret), from Proto-Germanic *darnijaz (secret). More at dern.

VerbEdit

Darning.

darn (third-person singular simple present darns, present participle darning, simple past and past participle darned)

  1. (transitive, sewing) To repair by stitching with thread or yarn, particularly by using a needle to construct a weave across a damaged area of fabric.
    I need to darn these socks again.
    • Jonathan Swift
      He spent every day ten hours in his closet, in darning his stockings.
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NounEdit

darn (plural darns)

  1. A place mended by darning.

AnagramsEdit

Last modified on 8 April 2014, at 00:42