EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English fleien, from Old English flēgan.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

fley (third-person singular simple present fleys, present participle fleying, simple past and past participle fleyed)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To frighten.
    • 1860, James Phillips Kay, Scarsdale; or, Life on the Lancashire and Yorkshire border:
      The Jack O'Lanthron was among the reeds again last night, and some of my neighbours are sore fleyed.
  2. (obsolete, intransitive) To be frightened.

AnagramsEdit


IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse fley, from Proto-Germanic *flawją.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fley n (genitive singular fleys, nominative plural fley)

  1. (poetic) ship, boat

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English flēa.

NounEdit

fley

  1. Alternative form of fle

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English flȳġe.

NounEdit

fley

  1. Alternative form of flye

Etymology 3Edit

From Old English flēogan.

VerbEdit

fley

  1. Alternative form of flien