foretest

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From fore- +‎ test.

NounEdit

foretest (plural foretests)

  1. A test conducted or given beforehand; a preliminary test conducted before the inception of an experiment or evaluation.
    • 1964, Perceptual and Motor Skills:
      This procedure provided a foretest, inspection period, and aftertest, and each 5 underwent one such trial series.
    • 1972, Morris E. Eson, Psychological foundations of education:
      Even if he had found positive transfer effects, one could have attributed the gain to the practice effect during the foretest rather than to the improvement of memory per se.
    • 2014, Robert S. Woodworth, Donald G. Marquis, Psychology (Psychology Revivals): A Study of Mental Life:
      The children who made very low ascendancy scores in the foretest were then trained by the experimenter till they had complete mastery of certain play materials—blocks for building certain designs, a jigsaw puzzle, a picture book with its story—[…]

AntonymsEdit

VerbEdit

foretest (third-person singular simple present foretests, present participle foretesting, simple past and past participle foretested)

  1. (transitive) To test beforehand or in advance.
    • 1977, Research Journal of the Shreemati Nathibai Damodar Thackersey Women's University:
      The instrument used in this study would be helpful to foretest advisees and hence would facilitate advisor's work in the direction of detecting maladjustments.
  2. (transitive, rare) To give evidence for beforehand or in advance.
    • 1988, Indian Journal of Politics:
      This indicates that probably Muslims foretested a greater importance in the diplomatic corps than the modern western states.