beforehand

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English biforhand, biforhond, beforehonde, bifornhand, equivalent to before +‎ hand. [13th century. After Old French avant main]

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

beforehand (not comparable)

  1. At an earlier or preceding time.
    Will it be possible to have access to the room beforehand so that we can set up chairs?

SynonymsEdit

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AdjectiveEdit

beforehand (comparative more beforehand, superlative most beforehand)

  1. (obsolete) In comfortable circumstances as regards property; forehanded.
  2. (archaic, often followed by with) In a state of anticipation or preoccupation.
    • 1670, John Milton, The History of Britain, [] , London: Printed by J.M. for James Alleſtry, [] , OCLC 78038412:
      Agricola [] resolves to be beforehand with the danger.
    • April 6 1716, Joseph Addison, The Freeloader No. 31
      The last cited author has been beforehand with me.
    • 1839, London Medical Gazette: Or, Journal of Practical Medicine
      [] the medical attendant ought to be rather beforehand with the symptoms of excitement, and to diminish the large quantity of wine before they appear.

Derived termsEdit