foule

See also: foulé

EnglishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

foule (comparative more foule, superlative most foule)

  1. Obsolete form of foul.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle French foule (group of men, people collectively), alteration (due to Middle French foule (act of treading)) of Old French foulc (people, multitude, crowd, troop), from Vulgar Latin, from Frankish *folc, *fulc (crowd, multitude, people), from Proto-Germanic *fulką (collection or class of people, multitude; host of warriors), perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *pelə- (to fill). Cognate with Old High German folc (people collectively, nation), Old English folc (common people, troop, multitude). More at folk.

NounEdit

foule f (plural foules)

  1. crowd
  2. the thronging of a crowd
  3. a great number, multitude, mass; host

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle French foule (the act of milling clothes or hats) and fouler (to trample, mill, fordo, mistreat), from Old French foler (to crush, act wickedly), from Latin fullō (I trample, I full). More at full.

NounEdit

foule f (plural foules)

  1. the act or process of treading or milling
  2. oppression, vexation

VerbEdit

foule

  1. first-person singular present indicative of fouler
  2. third-person singular present indicative of fouler
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of fouler
  4. first-person singular present subjunctive of fouler
  5. second-person singular imperative of fouler

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

VerbEdit

foule

  1. First-person singular present of foulen.
  2. First-person singular subjunctive I of foulen.
  3. Third-person singular subjunctive I of foulen.
  4. Imperative singular of foulen.

JèrriaisEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French foulc (people, multitude, crowd, troop), of Germanic origin.

NounEdit

foule f (plural foules)

  1. crowd

SynonymsEdit

Last modified on 27 March 2014, at 23:16