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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French frisson.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈfɹiː.sɔ̃ː/
  • (US) IPA(key): /fɹiˈsoʊn/, /fɹiˈsõʊn/
  • (file)

NounEdit

frisson (plural frissons)

  1. A sudden surge of excitement.
    I felt a frisson just as they were about to announce the winner in my category.
  2. A shiver, a thrill.
    Whenever the villain's theme played in the movie I felt a sudden frisson down my back.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin *frīctiō, from Latin frīgeō (to be cold). Unrelated to the Classical Latin frictiō, borrowed as French friction.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

frisson m (plural frissons)

  1. A shiver or thrill of fright that can be strangely pleasurable, as when reading good horror fiction.
  2. An experience of intense excitement.

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit