fiction

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English ficcioun, from Old French ficcion (dissimulation, ruse, invention), from Latin fictiō (a making, fashioning, a feigning, a rhetorical or legal fiction), from fingō (to form, mold, shape, devise, feign).

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: fĭk′-shən, IPA(key): /ˈfɪk.ʃən/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: fic‧tion

NounEdit

fiction (countable and uncountable, plural fictions)

  1. Literary type using invented or imaginative writing, instead of real facts, usually written as prose.
    The company’s accounts contained a number of blatant fictions.
    I am a great reader of fiction.
    the fiction section of the library
    • 1963 June, G. Freeman Allen, “The success of diesel-hydraulics on the German Federal Railway”, in Modern Railways, page 390:
      [...] in view of the facts—and some fictions—recently circulated in this country about the general performance of high-powered diesel-hydraulics of B.R., [...].
  2. (uncountable) A verbal or written account that is not based on actual events (often intended to mislead).
    The butler’s account of the crime was pure fiction.
    separate the fact from the fiction
  3. (law) A legal fiction.

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DescendantsEdit

  • Irish: ficsean
  • Scottish Gaelic: ficsean

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French, borrowed from Latin fictionem (nominative of fictio).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fiction f (plural fictions)

  1. fiction

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit