See also: fufú, fúfu, fūfù, and foo-foo

EnglishEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From West African languages such as Ewe, fufú (white-white).

NounEdit

fufu (uncountable)

  1. A dish of boiled, mashed cassava mixed with plantain, yams, or other starchy vegetables, common as food in West and Equatorial Africa and the Caribbean. Sold in speciality stores (US) in dry powdered or granulated form.
    • [1987 July 29, Steven Barboza, “Culinary Delights of Africa Reflect a Continent's Diversity”, in The New York Times[1], ISSN 0362-4331:
      Africans generally serve highly seasoned stews with a starch - corn, millet, yams, cassava or rice - which they mash and whip to a paste, called fufu in West Africa. This is topped with a sauce known as palava.]
    • 2018, Nnedi Okorafor, Who Fears Death, HarperVoyager, page 192:
      “I want some real food,” Binta angrily said. “Like fufu and egusi soup.”

SynonymsEdit

  • (dish of yams etc): choke-me (Caribbean)

ReferencesEdit

  • Frederic Gomes Cassidy and Robert Brock Le Page (editors), Dictionary of Jamaican English, Second Edition, University of the West Indies Press (2002), page 185.

BuraEdit

NounEdit

fufu

  1. lungs

ReferencesEdit

  • Schuh, Russel G.; Shalanguwa, Elisha. Bura-English-Hausa Dictionary

KrioEdit

EtymologyEdit

From any of various African languages that share this word.

NounEdit

fufu

  1. fufu