See also: ha ha, há há, ha-ha, hāhā, and нана

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

A person laughing, the sound that haha is based on.

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English haha, ha ha, from Old English ha ha (interjection), ultimately onomatopoeic. Compare Old Frisian haha (interjection), Middle Low German hahā, hahahā (interjection), Middle High German hahā, haha (interjection), all expressions of joy or of laughter.

InterjectionEdit

haha

  1. An onomatopoeic representation of laughter.
Usage notesEdit
  • Can be used with as many ‘ha’s for emphasis.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

haha (third-person singular simple present hahas, present participle hahaing or haha-ing, simple past and past participle hahaed or haha-ed or haha'd)

  1. To laugh.
    • 1860, Frederick Gerstaecker, Lascelles Wraxall, transl., Frank Wildman’s Adventures on Land and Water, Boston, Mass.: Crosby, Nichols, and Company, [], page 124:
      First he regarded the strangers, then his own band, and his mouth was expanded to a still wider grin; his eyes opened to their fullest extent, and at last he haha’d as furiously and heartily as the worst of the sailors, which was naturally the signal for an outbreak on the part of the islanders.
    • 1908, Field and Stream, page 832:
      Emett yelled for him, and Jones and Jim “hahaed!”
    • 2014, Rachel Hauck, A March Bride: A Year of Weddings Novella, Zondervan, →ISBN:
      She haha’d like she ate diamonds for breakfast and flossed with spun gold.
    • 2017, Deborah E. Kennedy, Tornado Weather, Flatiron Books, →ISBN, page 17:
      Then she shrugged and haha-ed again and mumbled, “Poor souls,” because she thought she was safe and none of us could comprehend a single word she said.
    • 2021, Ali Stroker; Stacy Davidowitz, The Chance to Fly, Amulet Books, →ISBN:
      NatThrowinAwayMyShot: Haha, what?! GoChloGo: Y r u haha-ing?

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from French haha. The French term attested 1686 in toponyms in New France (present-day Quebec); compare modern Saint-Louis-du-Ha! Ha!. Usual etymology is that an expression of surprise – “ha ha” or “ah! ah!” is exclaimed on encountering such a boundary. In France this is traditionally attributed to the reaction of Louis, Grand Dauphin to encountering such a feature in the gardens of the Château de Meudon. The English term attested 1712, in translation by John James of French La theorie et la pratique du jardinage (1709) by Dezallier d'Argenville:

Grills of iron are very necessary ornaments in the lines of walks, to extend the view, and to show the country to advantage. At present we frequently make thoroughviews, called Ah, Ah, which are openings in the walls, without grills, to the very level of the walks, with a large and deep ditch at the foot of them, lined on both sides to sustain the earth, and prevent the getting over; which surprises the eye upon coming near it, and makes one laugh, Ha! Ha! from where it takes its name. This sort of opening is haha, on some occasions, to be preferred, for that it does not at all interrupt the prospect, as the bars of a grill do.

NounEdit

 
A cross-sectional view of a ha-ha
 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

haha (plural hahas)

  1. Type of boundary to a garden, pleasure-ground, or park, designed not to interrupt the view and to be invisible until closely approached.
    • 1785, Horace Walpole, On Modern Gardening:
      The Ha Ha But the capital stroke, the leading step to all that, has followed, was (I believe the first thought was Bridgman's) the destruction of walls for boundaries, and the invention of fosses - an attempt then deemed so astonishing, that the common people called them Ha! Ha's! to express their surprise at finding a sudden and unperceived check to their walk. One of the first gardens planted in this simple though still formal style was my father's at Houghton. It was laid out by Mr. Eyre, an imitator of Bridgman. It contains three-and-twenty acres, then reckoned a considerable portion.
    • 1731, Richard Bradley, New improvements of planting and gardening, both philosophical and practical (London), page 164:
      Haha! or Fossee, are Terms of the same Signification, tho' the First is a new coin'd Word, they mean a Ditch, or Moat to Enclose a Garden, whether the Ditch has Water in it, or not, but the Haha, by the Custom of five or six Years, intimates a dry Ditch, so regulated by Slopes, and so Deep that it is unpassable. It makes a fine open Fence to a Ground.
    • 1862, Anthony Trollope, The Small House at Allington, chapter VIII:
      And then that pair went off together, fighting their own little battle on that head, as turtle-doves will sometimes do. They went off, and Bernard was left with Bell standing together over the ha-ha fence which divides the garden at the back of the house from the field.
    • 1993, Elizabeth Gundrey; Walter Gundrey, Jacqueline Krendel, editor, Cottages, B and Bs and Country Inns of England and Wales, Fodor’s Travel Guides, →ISBN, page 220:
      The estate was cleverly landscaped to give an almost park-like view from the house: copses were planted to conceal buildings, hahas dug to replace fences or hedges.

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

haha (uncountable)

  1. A large leafy Hawaiian plant, Gunnera petaloidea.

EseEdit

NounEdit

haha

  1. (anatomy) body

EsperantoEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈhaha]
  • Rhymes: -aha
  • Hyphenation: ha‧ha

InterjectionEdit

haha

  1. haha (representation of laughter)

Related termsEdit


EstonianEdit

NounEdit

haha

  1. genitive singular of hahk

FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Duplication of ha.

InterjectionEdit

haha

  1. haha, ha-ha (laughing)

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Onomatopoeic.

InterjectionEdit

haha

  1. ha-ha (imitative of laughter)

Etymology 2Edit

French term attested 1686 in toponyms in New France (present-day Quebec); compare modern Saint-Louis-du-Ha! Ha!. Usual etymology is that an expression of surprise – “ha ha” or “ah! ah!” is exclaimed on encountering such a boundary. In France this is traditionally attributed to the reaction of Louis, Grand Dauphin to encountering such a feature in the gardens of the Château de Meudon.

NounEdit

haha m (plural hahas)

  1. ha-ha (ditch acting as a sunken fence)

Further readingEdit


JamamadíEdit

VerbEdit

haha

  1. (Banawá) to laugh

ReferencesEdit


JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

haha

  1. Rōmaji transcription of はは

ManchuEdit

RomanizationEdit

haha

  1. Romanization of ᡥᠠᡥᠠ

MaoriEdit

VerbEdit

haha

  1. look for

PortugueseEdit

InterjectionEdit

haha

  1. haha (representation of laughter)
    Synonym: (Internet) kkk

Rapa NuiEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Polynesian *fafa. Cognates include Hawaiian waha and Tahitian vaha.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈha.ha/
  • Hyphenation: ha‧ha

NounEdit

haha

  1. mouth

ReferencesEdit

  • Veronica Du Feu (1996) Rapanui (Descriptive Grammars), Routledge, →ISBN, page 205
  • Paulus Kieviet (2017) A grammar of Rapa Nui[1], Berlin: Language Science Press, →ISBN, page 29

TagalogEdit

Pronunciation 1Edit

  • Hyphenation: ha‧ha
  • IPA(key): /ˈhahaʔ/, [ˈha.hɐʔ]

NounEdit

hahà (Baybayin spelling ᜑᜑ)

  1. big rip; big tear
Derived termsEdit

Pronunciation 2Edit

  • Hyphenation: ha‧ha
  • IPA(key): /haˈhaʔ/, [hɐˈhaʔ]

AdjectiveEdit

hahâ (Baybayin spelling ᜑᜑ)

  1. with a big rip or tear

Pronunciation 3Edit

  • Hyphenation: ha‧ha
  • IPA(key): /haˈha/, [hɐˈha]

NounEdit

hahá (Baybayin spelling ᜑᜑ)

  1. (obsolete) name of the Baybayin letter , corresponding to "ha"

TboliEdit

NounEdit

haha

  1. (anatomy) thigh; lap