Etymology

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Derived from generala +‎ -e and genero +‎ -ale.

Pronunciation

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Adverb

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generale

  1. generally, in general

Italian

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Etymology

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From Latin generālis.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /d͡ʒe.neˈra.le/
  • Rhymes: -ale
  • Hyphenation: ge‧ne‧rà‧le
  • Audio:(file)

Adjective

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generale (plural generali)

  1. general

Noun

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generale m (plural generali)

  1. (military) general
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Latin

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Adjective

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generāle

  1. nominative/accusative/vocative neuter singular of generālis

References

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Spanish

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Verb

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generale

  1. second-person singular voseo imperative of generar combined with le

Yola

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Etymology

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From Middle English generale, from Anglo-Norman general, from Latin generālis.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˌd͡ʒɛnəˈɾɔːɫ/

Adjective

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generale

  1. common
    • 1867, CONGRATULATORY ADDRESS IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, page 114, lines 14-15:
      Mang ourzels——var wee dwytheth an Irelonde az ure generale haime——
      Unto ourselves——for we look on Ireland to be our common country——
    • 1867, CONGRATULATORY ADDRESS IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, page 114, lines 19-21:
      —t'avance pace an livertie, an, wi'oute vlynch, ee garde o' generale reights an poplare vartue.
      to promote peace and liberty—the uncompromising guardian of common right and public virtue.
    • 1867, CONGRATULATORY ADDRESS IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, page 116, lines 9-10:
      Wi Irishmen owre generale hopes be ee-bond——
      With Irishmen our common hopes are inseparably bound up——

References

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  • Jacob Poole (d. 1827) (before 1828) William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, published 1867, page 114