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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French le.

PronunciationEdit

ArticleEdit

le

  1. (informal, humorous, chiefly Internet) the
    • 2001 June 24, LaManna, “My Weekend...”, in alt.punk, Usenet[1]:
      [] upon arrival, le girlfriend realizes she has left her ID back at my house (a 1 1/2 hour roundtrip on the Metro), []
    • 2002 December 27, Amelia, “Re: Neat things SANTA brought me...”, in alt.fashion, Usenet[2]:
      And then le boyfriend perks up and names around 8 different brands (Stila, MAC, Becca, Nars etc..) - I was *SO* proud of him!! :)
    • 2003 January 10, johnny dupe (quoting nowhere man), “Re: I can walk with jezus...”, in alt.fan.wings, Usenet[3]:
      That was always OUR song (me and le girlfriend of the time).

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


BretonEdit

NounEdit

le ? (plural leou)

  1. vow

DalmatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin illae, nominative feminine plural of ille.

ArticleEdit

le f pl

  1. the

Related termsEdit


DanishEdit

 
En le – a scythe.

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse (scythe).

NounEdit

le c (singular definite leen, plural indefinite leer)

  1. scythe (farm tool)
InflectionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse hlæja, from Proto-Germanic *hlahjaną.

VerbEdit

le (imperative le, present ler, past lo, past participle leet or let)

  1. to laugh (show mirth by peculiar movement of the muscles of the face and emission of sounds)

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French le, from Latin illum, by dropping il- and -m. Latin illum is the accusative singular of ille.[1]

PronunciationEdit

ArticleEdit

le m (feminine la, masculine and feminine plural les)

  1. The (definite article).
    Le lait du matin.The milk of the morning.
    [J]e suis le valeureux Don Quichotte de la Manche, le défaiseur de torts et le réparateur d’iniquités.
    I am the valiant Don Quixote of La Mancha, the undoer of wrongs and the repairer of iniquities. (1837, Louis Viardot, L’Ingénieux Hidalgo Don Quichotte de la Manche, translation of El ingenioso hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Volume I, Chapter IV)
  2. Used before abstract nouns; not translated in English.
  3. (before parts of the body) The; my, your, etc.
    Il s’est cassé la jambe.He has broken his leg.
  4. (before units) A, an.
    Cinquante kilomètres à l’heure.fifty kilometres an hour

Usage notesEdit

  • le becomes l’ before a vowel or an unaspirated h.
    l’amourlove
    l’hommethe man
  • de le is never used: contracted into du.
  • à le is never used: contracted into au.
    Il a une cicatrice au visage.He has a scar on the face. / He has a scar on his face.
  • However, de le and à le become de l' and à l' respectively in front of a vowel or an unaspirated h.

PronounEdit

le m (feminine la, masculine and feminine plural les)

  1. (direct object) Him, it.
  2. (used to refer to something previously mentioned or implied; not translated in English).
    Je suis petit et lui, il l’est aussi.I am small and he is too ("he is it too", i.e., "he is small too").

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Dauzat, Albert; Jean Dubois, Henri Mitterand (1964), “le, la, les”, in Nouveau dictionnaire étymologique (in French), Paris: Librairie Larousse

Further readingEdit


FriulianEdit

PronounEdit

le (third person feminine direct object)

  1. her

Related termsEdit


GalicianEdit

HungarianEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

le (not comparable)

  1. down

IdoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Italian le.

PronunciationEdit

ArticleEdit

le (plural)

  1. the (used only when there is no other sign of plurality, for example with nominalized adjectives)
    Yen pomi, prenez le bona e lasez le mala.
    Here's apples, take the good ones and leave the bad ones.

NounEdit

le (plural le-i)

  1. The name of the Latin script letter L/l.

See alsoEdit

See alsoEdit


InterlinguaEdit

ArticleEdit

le

  1. the

Usage notesEdit

  • de le is contracted into del.
  • a le is contracted into al.

PronounEdit

le m (plural les)

  1. him (direct object)
    Io le appella mi amico — I call him my friend.

IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (superseded)

EtymologyEdit

From a conflation of two Early Modern Irish prepositions:

  1. re (to), from Old Irish fri, from Proto-Celtic *writ- (compare Welsh wrth, prefix gwrth-), from Proto-Indo-European *wert- (to turn) (compare Latin versus (against)).
  2. le (with), from Old Irish la, from Proto-Celtic *let-, from Proto-Celtic *letos (side) (compare leath, Welsh lled).

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

le (plus dative, triggers h-prothesis, before the definite article leis)

  1. with
    le héadachwith clothing
  2. used in conjunction with the copula particle is to indicate possession
    Is liomsa an hataThe hat is mine; the hat belongs to me
    Is le Cáit an peann luaidhe.The pencil is Cáit’s; the pencil belongs to Cáit.
  3. to (indicating purpose; in this sense triggering eclipsis of ithe (eating) and ól (drinking))
    rud le n-ithesomething to eat
    oiriúnach le n-ólfit to drink
    ró-the le n-óltoo hot to drink
  4. in order to
    le rud a dhéanamhin order to do a thing
    Synonyms: chun, d'fhonn

InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

  • "le" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Entries containing “le” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.
  • fri” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.
  • la” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin illae, which is the nominative plural feminine of ille.[1]

ArticleEdit

Italian Definite Articles
singular plural
masculine il
lo
i
gli
feminine  la le

le f pl (singular la)

  1. the
Usage notesEdit
  • Contrary to la, le does not elide before words that begin with a vowel.

PronounEdit

le f pl (singular la)

  1. them (third-person plural feminine)
    Le ho viste — I saw them.

Etymology 2Edit

PronounEdit

le

  1. (dative) her, to her
    Le ho detto che la amo — I told her that I love her.
    Le ho dato la lettera — I gave her the letter or I gave the letter to her.
  2. (dative) you, to you
    Non Le ho detto il mio nome — I didn't tell you my name.
    Le ho dato la lettera — I gave you the letter or I gave the letter to you.
Usage notesEdit
  • When le is used in the formal sense, it is usually capitalised as Le to avoid confusion with le meaning "her".

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Patota, Giuseppe (2002) Lineamenti di grammatica storica dell'italiano (in Italian), Bologna: il Mulino, ISBN 88-15-08638-2, page 127

LojbanEdit

CmavoEdit

le (article)

  1. returns a definite instance of an x1 sumti (argument) of the following word, which would otherwise function as a selbri (predicate); thus, "le" and the word which follows it together act like a sumti (argument)

ExamplesEdit

  1. Example:
    le tavla cu sutra tavla
    the talker talks fast
    Example:
    la suzyn. pu dunda ti'u li rere boi pa le re cukta mi
    Susan gave, at 10 PM, one of the two books to me
    .

Usage notesEdit

  • A sumti (argument) phrase begun with le ends with the cmavo ku unless no ambiguity results.
  • An "inner quantifier" indicates number of members in the group (which is the subject of the predication), whereas an "outer quantifier" indicates a portion of that number, so "le ci nanmu" would mean "the three men" whereas "ci le nanmu" would mean "three of the men", "ci le mu nanmu" would mean "three of the five men"; so, as a rough analogy, le could be said to act as a divider (whereas lo acts as a multiplier, according to the xorlo proposal).

Related termsEdit


MalteseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate with Arabic لا and Hebrew לא

AdverbEdit

le

  1. no

See alsoEdit


MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

le (Zhuyin ㄌㄜ˙)

  1. Pinyin transcription of
  2. Pinyin transcription of ,

le

  1. Nonstandard spelling of .
  2. Nonstandard spelling of .

Usage notesEdit

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

MeriamEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Rotuman.

NounEdit

le

  1. person

Middle FrenchEdit

ArticleEdit

le m (feminine la, masculine and feminine plural les)

  1. the

DescendantsEdit

  • French: le

NeapolitanEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

le

  1. Alternative form of 'e

Coordinate termsEdit

Number Person Nominative Accusative Dative Reflexive Possessive Prepositional
singular first-person io (i') me mìo, mìa, mieje, meje me, méne
second-person, familiar tu te tùjo, tòja, tùoje, tòje te, téne
second-person, formal vuje ve vuósto, vósta, vuóste, vóste vuje
third-person, masculine ìsso 'o, 'u (lo, lu) 'i, 'e (li, le) se sùjo, sòja, sùoje, sòje ìsso
third-person, feminine éssa 'a (la) 'e (le) éssa
plural first-person nuje ce nuósto, nòsta, nuóste, nòste nuje
second-person, plural vuje ve vuósto, vòsta, vuóste, vòste vuje
third-person, masculine ìsse 'i, 'e (li, le) llòro se llòro (invariable) llòro
third-person, feminine llòro 'e (le)

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse hlé

AdjectiveEdit

  • le (indeclinable)
  1. lee or leeward (side)

NounEdit

le n

  1. lee (sheltered or leeward side)
  2. shelter

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse hlæja (to laugh), from Proto-Germanic *hlahjaną, from Proto-Indo-European *klek-, *kleg- (to shout).

VerbEdit

le (imperative le, present tense ler, passive -, simple past lo, past participle ledd, present participle leende)

  1. to laugh

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse hlé. Akin to English lee.

AdjectiveEdit

  • le (indeclinable)
  1. lee or leeward (side)

NounEdit

le n

  1. lee (sheltered or leeward side)
  2. shelter

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse hlæja (to laugh), from Proto-Germanic *hlahjaną, from Proto-Indo-European *klek-, *kleg- (to shout). Akin to English laugh.

VerbEdit

le (present tense ler, past tense lo, past participle ledd or lett, present participle leande, imperative le)

  1. to laugh

ReferencesEdit


NovialEdit

PronounEdit

le

  1. (s)he; him or her

Related termsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • lo (9th century in The Sequence of Saint Eulalia and 10th century in La Vie de Saint Léger)

ArticleEdit

le

  1. the (masculine singular oblique definite article)
  2. (Picardy, Anglo-Norman) the (feminine singular definite article)

InflectionEdit

PronounEdit

le

  1. it (masculine singular object pronoun)

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin illīs, dative common plural of ille.

PronunciationEdit

  • Rhymes: -e

PronounEdit

le m (unstressed dative form of ei)

  1. (indirect object, third-person masculine plural) to them (all-male or mixed group)

PronounEdit

le f (unstressed dative form of ele)

  1. (indirect object, third-person feminine plural) to them (all-female group)

PronounEdit

le m (unstressed accusative form of ele)

  1. (direct object, third-person feminine plural) them (all-female group)

Related termsEdit

  • lor (stressed dative of ei and ele)
  • ele (stressed accusative of ele)
  • îl (unstressed dative of el (singular))
  • îi (unstressed dative of ea (singular) and unstressed accusative of ei (masculine))
  • o (unstressed accusative of ea (singular))

SamoanEdit

ArticleEdit

le

  1. the (the definite article)

Usage notesEdit

Only in the singular. Sometimes used where the indefinite article would be used in English.

See alsoEdit


Scottish GaelicEdit

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

le

  1. with
  2. by
  3. down
    thuit e leis a' chreig - he fell down the rock
    deòir a' ruith leis a h-aodann - tears running down her face

Usage notesEdit

  • This form is used before nouns without the definite article; before the definite article the form leis is used.

Derived termsEdit

Person Number Prepositional pronoun Prepositional pronoun (emphatic)
Singular 1st leam leamsa
2nd leat leatsa
3rd m leis leis-san
3rd f leatha leathase
Plural 1st leinn leinne
2nd leibh leibhse
3rd leotha leothasan

Serbo-CroatianEdit

AdverbEdit

le (Cyrillic spelling ле)

  1. (archaic) only
    • 1556, Hanibal Lucić, U vrime ko čisto
      Nego se varteći dugo tuj zamani,
      Goro, le htih reći, zbogome ostani.

Related termsEdit


SloveneEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

  1. only, merely, just

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin illī, dative of ille.

PronounEdit

le

  1. To him, for him (dative of él)
    Mi mamá va a escribirle una carta a mi hermano. — My mom is going to write a letter to my brother.
  2. To her, for her (dative of ella)
    Le dio un beso a Ana. — He gave Ana a kiss.
  3. To it, for it (dative of ello)
    ¡Ponle esfuerzo! — Put some effort into it!
  4. To you, for you (formal; dative of usted)
    ¿A usted le gustan los caballos? — Do you like horses?

Usage notesEdit

  • Though le is usually the indirect object form of the direct object pronouns lo/la, it is often used as a direct object as well...e.g., «yo le amo» (I love him). This phenomenon is known as leísmo.
  • Note that when a sentence contains a noun that is an indirect object, a redundant indirect object le (or its plural form les) is also required; for example «yo le daré el libro a Jorge» (literally, "I him will give the book to Jorge"), where him/le corresponds to Jorge. This type of pronoun is obligatory. Both of the object pronouns le and les become se when followed by the direct object lo/la/los/las; hence, «yo se lo daré» (I will give it to him/her/them) rather than «yo le/les lo daré».

See alsoEdit


SwahiliEdit

AdjectiveEdit

-le (declinable)

  1. that (distal demonstrative adjective)

InflectionEdit

See alsoEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Swedish lēia, lea, from Old Norse hlæja (to laugh), from Proto-Germanic *hlahjaną.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

le

  1. to smile
  2. (obsolete) to laugh

ConjugationEdit


Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


TarantinoEdit

Alternative formsEdit

ArticleEdit

le m pl, f pl

  1. the

TurkishEdit

NounEdit

le

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter L/l.

See alsoEdit


WelshEdit

NounEdit

le

  1. Soft mutation of lle.

XhosaEdit

Etymology 1Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

PronounEdit

le

  1. these; class 4 proximal demonstrative.

Etymology 2Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

PronounEdit

le

  1. this; class 9 proximal demonstrative.

ZuluEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

PronounEdit

le

  1. these; class 4 proximal demonstrative.
InflectionEdit
Stem -lé
Full form
Locative kule
Full form
Locative kule
Copulative yile
Possessive forms
Modifier Substantive
Class 1 wale owale
Class 2 bale abale
Class 3 wale owale
Class 4 yale eyale
Class 5 lale elale
Class 6 ale awale
Class 7 sale esale
Class 8 zale ezale
Class 9 yale eyale
Class 10 zale ezale
Class 11 lwale olwale
Class 14 bale obale
Class 15 kwale okwale
Class 17 kwale okwale

Etymology 2Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

PronounEdit

le

  1. this; class 9 proximal demonstrative.
InflectionEdit
Stem -lé
Full form
Locative kule
Full form
Locative kule
Copulative yile
Possessive forms
Modifier Substantive
Class 1 wale owale
Class 2 bale abale
Class 3 wale owale
Class 4 yale eyale
Class 5 lale elale
Class 6 ale awale
Class 7 sale esale
Class 8 zale ezale
Class 9 yale eyale
Class 10 zale ezale
Class 11 lwale olwale
Class 14 bale obale
Class 15 kwale okwale
Class 17 kwale okwale

ReferencesEdit