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gormy

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Related to the largely synonymous word gorming.

AdjectiveEdit

gormy (not comparable)

  1. (US and Britain, dialectal, chiefly Northern England and New England) Clumsy, awkward, ungainly, klutzy.
    • 1990, John Gould, There Goes Maine!, →ISBN, page 1187:
      And not always with finesse — the Lombard clanked and churned, and a man who is like a regular Lombard may be a bit gormy and sometimes apply brute strength when he might do the work easier if he'd stop and think a little.
    • 1990, Maurice Shadbolt, Monday's Warriors: A Novel, →ISBN, page 5:
      Kimball was never one to argue with a comrade's eyes and ears, not even those of a gormy jeezer like Connolly.
    • 2009, Stephen King, Under the Dome: A Novel, →ISBN, page 682:
      The Killian boy was carrying a chair, and making difficulties with it; he was what old-time Yankees would have called “a gormy lad.”
    • 2010, Pat Cunningham, A London Werewolf in America, →ISBN, page 32:
      Just the sort of place gormy Eugene would pick to hold a family get-together.
    • For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:gormy.
SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • John Gould, ‎Lillian Ross, Maine lingo: boiled owls, billdads & wazzats (1975), page 114
  • Sidney Oldall Addy, A Supplement to the Sheffield Glossary, volume 22, issue 2 (1891), page 24

Etymology 2Edit

From gorm/gaum (smear) (see those entries for more).

AdjectiveEdit

gormy (not comparable)

  1. (US and Britain, dialectal, chiefly Southern US) Alternative form of gaumy (sticky, smeared with something sticky; grimy)
    • 1914, Edward Henry Peple, The prince chap, a comedy in three acts (1992 reprint →ISBN, page 50:
      The first thing you have got to do is to wash them gormy 'ands []
    • 1916, Clarke Abigail, Edward Everett Hale at Harvard College, part IV, in The Unitarian Register, volume 95, page 583:
      "When I bought my tamarinds I eat one or two and then discovered that I had left my handkerchief at home, my hands were a little gormy, so I washed them in Frog Pond."

ReferencesEdit

  • Mildred Jordan Brooks, Southern stuff: down-home talk and bodacious lore →ISBN, page 59: gormy, adj. Sticky or smeary. "Who wants to pick up a youngun all gormy with butter and 'lasses?"
  • Bennett Wood Green, Word-book of Virginia Folk-speech (1912), page 202: Gormy, adj. Smeary; sticky.