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EnglishEdit

 
Pancakes on a griddle
 
An electric griddle

EtymologyEdit

From Anglo-Norman gredil, variant of Old French greil, from Latin crāticulum, diminutive of crātis. Cognate to grill (grid of wire) from the same Old French and Latin sources.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

griddle (plural griddles)

  1. A stone or metal flat plate or suface on which food is fried or backed.
    • 1871, Louisa May Alcott, Little Men, chapter 5:
      Such a clatter as the little spoon made, and such a beating as the batter got, it quite foamed, I assure you; and when Daisy poured some on to the griddle, it rose like magic into a puffy flapjack that made Demi's mouth water.
    • 1894, Lance Rawson, Australian enquiry book of household and general information, Cookery:
      Some people when making scones do not trouble to light the oven but use the frying pan: of course if you have a griddle it is better than oven or pan, but very few people possess this useful utensil.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

griddle (third-person singular simple present griddles, present participle griddling, simple past and past participle griddled)

  1. To use a griddle, to cook on a griddle.

AnagramsEdit