grotesquely

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

grotesque +‎ -ly

AdverbEdit

grotesquely (comparative more grotesquely, superlative most grotesquely)

  1. In a grotesque manner; disgustingly.
    • 1907, Barbara Baynton, Sally Krimmer; Alan Lawson, editors, Human Toll (Portable Australian Authors: Barbara Baynton), St Lucia: University of Queensland Press, published 1980, page 209:
      Till the grotesquely angry scene was interrupted by the arrival of Mina, who came asking for Andrew.
    • 1887, H. Rider Haggard, She: A History of Adventure[1]:
      Anything more appalling than this jumbled mass of the remains of a departed race I cannot imagine, and what made it even more dreadful was that in this dry air a considerable number of the bodies had simply become desiccated with the skin still on them, and now, fixed in every conceivable position, stared at us out of the mountain of white bones, grotesquely horrible caricatures of humanity.

TranslationsEdit