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See also: hënt and Hënt

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • hente (13th-16th centuries)

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English henten (also hynten, hinten > English hint), from Old English hentan (to pursue, chase after, seize, arrest, grasp), from Proto-Germanic *hantijaną (to seize), related to Old English huntian (to hunt), Old High German hunda (spoils, booty).

VerbEdit

hent (third-person singular simple present hents, present participle henting, simple past and past participle hent)

  1. (obsolete) To take hold of, to grasp.
    • 1485 July 31, Thomas Malory, “(please specify the chapter)”, in [Le Morte Darthur], (please specify the book number), [London]: [] [by William Caxton], OCLC 71490786; republished as H[einrich] Oskar Sommer, editor, Le Morte Darthur [], London: Published by David Nutt, [], 1889, OCLC 890162034:
      , Bk.V, Ch.IX:
      And in the grekynge of the day Sir Gawayne hente his hors wondyrs for to seke.
  2. (obsolete) To take away, carry off, apprehend.
  3. (obsolete, transitive) To clear; to go beyond.

AnagramsEdit


BretonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Brythonic *hɨnt, from Proto-Celtic *sentus, from Proto-Indo-European *sent- (to head for, go).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hent m (plural hentoù)

  1. way, street

Norwegian BokmålEdit

VerbEdit

hent

  1. imperative of hente

Norwegian NynorskEdit

VerbEdit

hent

  1. imperative of hente

WestrobothnianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old Norse hentr

AdjectiveEdit

hent

  1. handy, skilful

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit