Contents

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the locative of humus (ground, soil). Ancient Greek χαμαί (khamaí, on the ground) is the same formation.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

humī (not comparable)

  1. on the ground.
  2. to the ground.

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • humi in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • humi in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • humi” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to fall on the ground: humi procumbere
    • to throw any one to the ground: humi prosternere aliquem
  • Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, 1st edition. (Oxford University Press)