ideality

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin ideālitās (ideality), from Late Latin ideālis (ideal); surface analysis ideal +‎ -ity.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ideality (countable and uncountable, plural idealities)

  1. (uncountable) The quality or state of being ideal.
    • 1834, Letitia Elizabeth Landon, Francesca Carrara, volume 2, page 32:
      It is commonly said that love never lasts. Now, that is not so much from change, or that it exhausts itself, as that it is mixed up with the paltry cares and daily interests of life; thus losing its ideality, which constitutes its great charm.
  2. (uncountable) The capacity to form deals of beauty or perfection.
  3. The conceptive faculty.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

TriviaEdit

Aside from the proper noun Oceania, this is the shortest five-syllable word in the English language.

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for “ideality” in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)