idea

Contents

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

PIE root
*weyd-

From Latin idea ‎(a (Platonic) idea; archetype), from Ancient Greek ἰδέα ‎(idéa, notion, pattern), from εἴδω ‎(eídō, I see), related to French idée.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

idea ‎(plural ideas or (rare) ideæ)

  1. (philosophy) An abstract archetype of a given thing, compared to which real-life examples are seen as imperfect approximations; pure essence, as opposed to actual examples. [from 14th c.]
    • 2013 October 19, “Trouble at the lab”, The Economist, volume 409, number 8858:
      The idea that the same experiments always get the same results, no matter who performs them, is one of the cornerstones of science’s claim to objective truth. If a systematic campaign of replication does not lead to the same results, then either the original research is flawed (as the replicators claim) or the replications are (as many of the original researchers on priming contend). Either way, something is awry.
  2. (obsolete) The conception of someone or something as representing a perfect example; an ideal. [16th-19th c.]
  3. (obsolete) The form or shape of something; a quintessential aspect or characteristic. [16th-18th c.]
    • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.6:
      The remembrance whereof (which yet I beare deepely imprinted in my minde) representing me her visage and Idea so lively and so naturally, doth in some sort reconcile me unto her.
  4. An image of an object that is formed in the mind or recalled by the memory. [from 16th c.]
    The mere idea of you is enough to excite me.
  5. More generally, any result of mental activity; a thought, a notion; a way of thinking. [from 17th c.]
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 3, in The Celebrity:
      Now all this was very fine, but not at all in keeping with the Celebrity's character as I had come to conceive it. The idea that adulation ever cloyed on him was ludicrous in itself. In fact I thought the whole story fishy, and came very near to saying so.
    • 1952, Alfred Whitney Griswold
      Ideas won't go to jail.
  6. A conception in the mind of something to be done; a plan for doing something, an intention. [from 17th c.]
    I have an idea of how we might escape.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 3, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      My hopes wa'n't disappointed. I never saw clams thicker than they was along them inshore flats. I filled my dreener in no time, and then it come to me that 'twouldn't be a bad idee to get a lot more, take 'em with me to Wellmouth, and peddle 'em out. Clams was fairly scarce over that side of the bay and ought to fetch a fair price.
    • 2013 June 1, “End of the peer show”, The Economist, volume 407, number 8838, page 71:
      Finance is seldom romantic. But the idea of peer-to-peer lending comes close. This is an industry that brings together individual savers and lenders on online platforms. Those that want to borrow are matched with those that want to lend.
  7. A vague or fanciful notion; a feeling or hunch; an impression. [from 17th c.]
    He had the wild idea that if he leant forward a little, he might be able to touch the mountain-top.
  8. (music) A musical theme or melodic subject. [from 18th c.]

SynonymsEdit

  • (mental transcript, image, or picture): image

DescendantsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

External linksEdit

StatisticsEdit

Most common English words before 1923: electronic · sea · necessary · #458: idea · reached · appeared · spoke

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin idea, from Ancient Greek ἰδέα ‎(idéa, notion, pattern), from εἴδω ‎(eídō, I see).

NounEdit

idea f ‎(plural idees)

  1. idea

Related termsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin idea, from Ancient Greek ἰδέα ‎(idéa, notion, pattern), from εἴδω ‎(eídō, I see).

NounEdit

idea f ‎(plural idees)

  1. idea (all senses)

Related termsEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

idea f

  1. idea (that which exists in the mind as the result of mental activity)

Related termsEdit

External linksEdit

  • idea in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • idea in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

FinnishEdit

NounEdit

idea

  1. idea

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of idea (Kotus type 12/kulkija, no gradation)
nominative idea ideat
genitive idean ideoiden
ideoitten
partitive ideaa ideoita
illative ideaan ideoihin
singular plural
nominative idea ideat
accusative nom. idea ideat
gen. idean
genitive idean ideoiden
ideoitten
ideainrare
partitive ideaa ideoita
inessive ideassa ideoissa
elative ideasta ideoista
illative ideaan ideoihin
adessive idealla ideoilla
ablative idealta ideoilta
allative idealle ideoille
essive ideana ideoina
translative ideaksi ideoiksi
instructive ideoin
abessive ideatta ideoitta
comitative ideoineen

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin idea, from Ancient Greek ἰδέα ‎(idéa, notion, pattern), from εἴδω ‎(eídō, I see).

NounEdit

idea f ‎(plural ideas)

  1. idea

Related termsEdit


HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin idea, from Ancient Greek ἰδέα ‎(idéa, notion, pattern). [1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈidɛɒ/
  • Hyphenation: idea

NounEdit

idea ‎(plural ideák)

  1. idea

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Tótfalusi István, Idegenszó-tár: Idegen szavak értelmező és etimológiai szótára. Tinta Könyvkiadó, Budapest, 2005, ISBN 963 7094 20 2

InterlinguaEdit

NounEdit

idea ‎(plural ideas)

  1. idea

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin idea, from Ancient Greek ἰδέα ‎(idéa, notion, pattern), from εἴδω ‎(eídō, I see).

NounEdit

idea f ‎(plural idee)

  1. idea

VerbEdit

idea

  1. third-person singular present tense of ideare
  2. second-person singular imperative of ideare

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek ἰδέα ‎(idéa, notion, pattern)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

idea f ‎(genitive ideae); first declension

  1. idea
  2. prototype (Platonic)

InflectionEdit

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative idea ideae
genitive ideae ideārum
dative ideae ideīs
accusative ideam ideās
ablative ideā ideīs
vocative idea ideae

DescendantsEdit


SlovakEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin idea ‎(a (Platonic) idea; archetype), from Ancient Greek ἰδέα ‎(idéa, notion, pattern), from εἴδω ‎(eídō, I see).

NounEdit

idea f ‎(genitive singular idey, nominative plural idey, declension pattern of idea)

  1. idea (that which exists in the mind as the result of mental activity)

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

External linksEdit

  • idea in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin idea, from Ancient Greek ἰδέα ‎(idéa, notion, pattern), from εἴδω ‎(eídō, I see). Compare Portuguese ideia.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

idea f ‎(plural ideas)

  1. idea

VerbEdit

idea

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of idear.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of idear.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of idear.
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