imprisonment

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Anglo-Norman emprisonement, from Old French emprisonnement. See imprison +‎ -ment.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɪmˈpɹɪzn̩.mənt/
  • (file)

NounEdit

imprisonment (countable and uncountable, plural imprisonments)

  1. A confinement in a place, especially a prison or a jail, as punishment for a crime.
    • (Can we date this quote by Spenser and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      His sinews waxen weak and raw / Through long imprisonment and hard constraint.
    • (Can we date this quote by Blackstone and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      Every confinement of the person is an imprisonment, whether it be in a common prison, or in a private house, or even by forcibly detaining one in the public streets.
    • (Can we date this quote by Sir Walter Raleigh and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      Oh, by what plots, by what forswearings, betrayings, oppressions, imprisonments, tortures, poisonings, and under what reasons of state and politic subtilty, have these forenamed kings [] pulled the vengeance of God upon themselves []

SynonymsEdit

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