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EnglishEdit

 
An incunabulum.

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin incūnābulum (cradle, origin).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˌɪn.kjʊˈnæb.jʊ.ləm/
  • (file)

NounEdit

incunabulum (plural incunabula)

  1. A book, single sheet, or image that was printed before the year 1501 in Europe.
    • 2004, Luisa Graves (translator), Carlos Ruiz Zafón (author), The Shadow of the Wind,
      Something about him reminded me of one of those figures from old-fashioned playing cards or the sort used by fortune-tellers, a print straight from the pages of an incunabulum: his presence was both funereal and incandescent, like a curse dressed in its Sunday best.

Usage notesEdit

  • This word is better known, and more widely used, in its plural form, incunabula.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From in- +‎ cūnābulum.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

incūnābulum n (genitive incūnābulī); second declension

  1. (especially in the plural) the apparatus of the cradle
  2. birthplace, origin

InflectionEdit

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative incūnābulum incūnābula
Genitive incūnābulī incūnābulōrum
Dative incūnābulō incūnābulīs
Accusative incūnābulum incūnābula
Ablative incūnābulō incūnābulīs
Vocative incūnābulum incūnābula

ReferencesEdit

  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) the origin, first beginnings of learning: incunabula doctrinae