EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

The origin is unclear; W. Ten Rhyne (1673) places it as one of the "Corrupt Dutch Words". If that identification is accurate, its origin may be Dutch kuras (cuirass).

NounEdit

kaross (plural karosses)

  1. (South Africa) A treated animal-skin cloak or blanket with the hair still left on.
    • 1878, "The Caracal" in the Encyclopædia Britannica, 9th ed., Vol. V, p. 81:
      In South Africa, where the caracal abounds, its hide is made by the Kaffres into skin cloaks, known as karosses.
    • 1897, James Bryce, Impressions of South Africa, p. 90:
      The wants of a native living with his tribe and cultivating mealies or Kafir corn are confined to a kaross (skin cloak) or some pieces of cotton cloth.
    • 1992, Mark Owens & al., Cry of the Kalahari, →ISBN:
      “Our bedroom had a sweeping view of the water and clean sheets and towels had been laid out for us on a kaross of jackal pelts.”
    • 1996, E Hausen, Human History at the Crossroads: Where Do We Go from Here?, →ISBN:
      “For the first two years, of life a baby was carried in a carrier, lined with absorbent grass, inside her kaross, (a treated animal skin made into a cape...)”

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