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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

kesar (plural kesars)

  1. Obsolete form of kaiser.
    • 1922, Alfred Edward Housman, Last Poems, VIII:
      Now no more of winters biting,
      Filth in trench from fall to spring,
      Summers full of sweat and fighting
      For the Kesar or the King.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Edmund Spenser to this entry?)

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for kesar in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Hindi केसर (kesar, saffron), from Sanskrit केसर (késara).

NounEdit

kesar (plural kesars)

  1. (South Asia) Saffron.
    kesar milk
    • 2001, Arun Kaul, Kesar: The cultural geography of Kashmir, in The Human Landscape, page 228:
      The newly emerging Muslim middle class would offer 'kesar' tea after marriages or other formal feasts, replacing the traditional tea leaves with kesar strands. [] Over the years Pampur's apiculture, claimed by many to create the best medicinal honey in the region, that is, kesar honey, has also prospered.

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