cooking

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From cook +‎ -ing. The noun and adjective follow from the verb. The use of the word cooking to describe cheap bitter was popularised by the title character of the BBC sitcom Oh No, It’s Selwyn Froggitt (1974-1978).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cooking (countable and uncountable, plural cookings)

  1. (uncountable) The process of preparing food by using heat.
    • 1913, Robert Barr, chapter 6, in Lord Stranleigh Abroad[1]:
      The men resided in a huge bunk house, which consisted of one room only, with a shack outside where the cooking was done. In the large room were a dozen bunks; half of them in a very dishevelled state, […]
    • 1995, Padraic O'Farrell, chapter 6, in Ancient Irish Legends:
      The cooking took a long time. Fionn built a spit from the ash that the salmon had knocked down.
    • 2014, Vickie Vaclavik, Elizabeth W. Christian, Essentials of Food Science, page 97:
      Of nutritional benefit in cooking is a short cooking time in a minimal amount of water or steaming the vegetables. Yet, there are times when just the opposite, that is lengthy cooking, with plentiful water may be desirable to achieve mild taste–foods such as mild tasting cooked onions may benefit from lengthy cooking and plentiful water.
  2. (countable, rare) An instance of preparing food by using heat.
    • 1904, Winston Churchill, The Crossing, page 1:
      In the tiny kitchen a dozen men and a boy tried to hush their breathing, and sweltered. For it was very hot, and the pent-up odor of past cookings was stifling to men used to the open
    • 1992, R. S. Khare, The Eternal Food: Gastronomic Ideas and Experiences of Hindus and Buddhists, page 194:
      This culinary process is but the first in a series of cookings, of which the intracorporeal cookings constitute the rest.
    • 2004, Michael Symons, A History of Cooks and Cooking, page 95:
      Historian Madeleine Pelner Cosman addresses the multiple cookings of single dishes in medieval recipes. Why would a veal stew require four changes of pot and five separate cookings?
  3. The result of preparing food by using heat.
    1. (uncountable) One's ability to prepare food; cookery.
      My cooking isn't very good. I don't have any idea how to prepare a good meal.
      I missed my mum's cooking while I was at university.
      • 2005, Diana Kirk, Sex, Lies and Rodeo Games, page 67:
        "I know his cooking is bad, but [] " She fluffed the pillows and placed them behind Suzanne's neck. "I thought Josh's cooking was much worse than Matt's, but I guess the bad-cook crown goes to the big guy."
      • 2012, J. M. Waters, Grey Falcon, page 14:
        His cooking is good to mediocre and most of the time, simple and filling.
      • 2013, Anna Bromley, Wild Animals and Wedding Outfits, page 145:
        Azie is a charming and attentive host. His cooking is excellent and the meals he prepares seem healthy and nutritious.
    2. (uncountable) The style or genre of food preparation.
      What you've produced is a perfect example of authentic Chinese cooking.
      • 2001, Reiko Weston, Cooking the Japanese Way, page 9:
        One of the most common styles of Japanese cooking is called nimono.
      • 2007, Andrea Broomfield, Food and Cooking in Victorian England: A History, page 3:
        No one, regardless of money and status, could work very successfully outside these variables, and as a result, people's diet and cooking were largely the same, although the rich could afford more food and more variety than could the poor.
      • 2009, Pat Chapman, India Food and Cooking: The Ultimate Book on Indian Cuisine, page 53:
        Though sesame is a minor spice in Indian cooking, it is an important export crop there. It has a somewhat neutral, nutty taste and it is used to texture delicate cooking.
  4. (uncountable) The cheapest available beer for sale in a public house; cooking bitter or cooking lager. [1]
    • 2009, David Nobbs, Reginald Perrin Omnibus: (Reginald Perrin), page 189:
      ‘Pint of bitter, please,” said Reggie. ‘Pint of cooking,” said the landlord.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

AdjectiveEdit

cooking (not comparable)

  1. Designed for culinary purposes
    I filled the cooking pot with water
    I put a lid on the cooking pan
  2. (informal) In progress, happening.
    The project took a few days to gain momentum, but by the end of the week, things were really cooking.
  3. (of an alcoholic drink) Cheap; better suited for use in recipes than drinking.
    • 1885, Bacchus(pseud.), New guide for the hotel, bar, restaurant [&c.]. Pt. 1, by Bacchus & Cordon Bleu, page 255:
      Bone a shoulder of mutton and lay in the following pickle for 24 hours, viz.:…half pint of cooking claret…and long peppers.
    • 2001, Langston Hughes, Arnold Rampersad, Dolan Hubbard, The Collected Works of Langston Hughes: Gospel Plays, Opera, and Later Dramatic Works, page 204:
      JOHN JASPER: Mama says for you to come on upstairs and bring her a pint of cooking sherry. BODIDDLY: You know your Mama ain’t gonna do no cooking this time of the night!
    • 2008, Henry Smith, The Master Book of Soups, page 188:
      Add 1 pint of cooking sherry and boil again for 30 minutes.

VerbEdit

cooking

  1. present participle of cook

ReferencesEdit

  • cooking at OneLook Dictionary Search.