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EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From kin +‎ folk.

NounEdit

kinfolk (countable and uncountable, plural kinfolks)

  1. (US, also in plural) Relatives, relations.
    • 1931, William Faulkner, Sanctuary, Vintage 1993, p. 122:
      ‘You have kinfolks here though. Women. That used to live in this house.’
    • 1982, Bernard Malamud, God’s Grace, New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux, “Cohn’s Island,”
      That says something about the nature of man—his fantasies of death that get enacted into the slaughter of man by man—kinfolk or strangers in droves—on every possible mindless occasion.

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