EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin lābilis (apt to slip, transient), from lābor, lābī (slip; glide, flow).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈleɪbaɪl/
    • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

labile (comparative more labile, superlative most labile)

  1. Liable to slip, err, fall, or apostatize.
  2. Apt or likely to change.
    Synonym: unstable
  3. (chemistry, of a compound or bond) Kinetically unstable; rapidly cleaved (and possibly reformed).
    Certain drugs can be conjugated to polymer molecules with a linkage that is labile at low pH to effect controlled release in a cellular endosome.
    Water ligands typically bind metals in a labile fashion and are rapidly interchanged in aqueous solution.
  4. (linguistics, of a verb) Able to change valency without changing its form; especially, able to be used both transitively and intransitively without changing its form.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

labile

  1. definite singular of labil
  2. indefinite plural of labil
  3. definite plural of labil

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin lābilis (apt to slip, transient), from lābor, lābī (slip; glide, flow).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

labile (plural labiles)

  1. labile

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin lābilis (apt to slip, transient), from lābor, lābī (slip; glide, flow).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈla.bi.le/
  • Rhymes: -abile
  • Hyphenation: là‧bi‧le

AdjectiveEdit

labile (plural labili)

  1. fleeting, ephemeral
  2. fickle

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • labile in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

lābile

  1. nominative/accusative/vocative neuter singular of lābilis