HausaEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English lecture.

NounEdit

laccā̀ f (plural laccōcī, possessed form laccàr̃)

  1. lecture

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈlak.ka/
  • Rhymes: -akka
  • Hyphenation: làc‧ca

Etymology 1Edit

From Old High German lahhā, lacha from Proto-West Germanic *laku.

NounEdit

lacca f (plural lacche)

  1. (archaic) hole, pit
    • 1321, Dante Alighieri, La divina commedia: Inferno [The Divine Comedy: Hell] (paperback), 12th edition, Le Monnier, published 1994, Canto VII, lines 16–18, page 107:
      Così scendemmo ne la quarta lacca, ¶ pigliando più de la dolente ripa ¶ che ’l mal de l’universo tutto insacca.
      Thus we descended into the fourth chasm, gaining still farther on the dolesome shore which all the woe of the universe insacks.

Etymology 2Edit

From Late Latin lacca (swelling on the shinbone of cattle).

NounEdit

lacca f (plural lacche) (archaic or regional, rare)

  1. poplite muscle
    Synonym: poplite
  2. thigh (of a four-legged animal)
    Synonym: coscia
  3. (by extension) (human) buttock
    Synonym: natica

Etymology 3Edit

From Medieval Latin lacca, of Arabic لَكّ(lakk), from Persian لاک(lāk), from Hindi लाख (lākh), from Sanskrit लाक्षा (lākṣā).

NounEdit

lacca f (plural lacche)

  1. varnish, lacquer

Etymology 4Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

lacca

  1. inflection of laccare:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *Hlak-, *lēk- (leg; the main muscle of the arm or leg). Compare English leg and Latin lacertus (upper arm).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lacca f (genitive laccae); first declension

  1. A swelling on the shinbone of cattle
  2. An unknown kind of plant

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative lacca laccae
Genitive laccae laccārum
Dative laccae laccīs
Accusative laccam laccās
Ablative laccā laccīs
Vocative lacca laccae

ReferencesEdit