Last modified on 24 March 2015, at 17:59

hole

See also: Hole

EnglishEdit

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Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English hole, hol, from Old English hol (orifice, hollow place, cavity), from Proto-Germanic *hulą (hollow space, cavity) noun derivative of Proto-Germanic *hulaz (hollow). Compare Dutch hol, Walloon hol, German Höhle, Swedish hål, Faroese hol (hole). More at hollow.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hole (plural holes)

  1. A hollow place or cavity; an excavation; a pit; an opening in or through a solid body, a fabric, etc.; a perforation; a rent; a fissure.
    There’s a hole in my shoe.  Her stocking has a hole in it.
    • Bible, 2 Kings xii.9:
      The priest took a chest, and bored a hole in the lid.
    • William Shakespeare (c.1564–1616)
      the holes where eyes should be
    • Alfred Tennyson (1809-1892)
      The blind walls were full of chinks and holes.
    • 1879, Richard Jefferies, The Amateur Poacher, chapterII:
      Orion hit a rabbit once; but though sore wounded it got to the bury, and, struggling in, the arrow caught the side of the hole and was drawn out. Indeed, a nail filed sharp is not of much avail as an arrowhead; you must have it barbed, and that was a little beyond our skill.
    1. An opening in a solid.
      There’s a hole in my bucket.
  2. (heading) In games.
    1. (golf) A subsurface standard-size hole, also called cup, hitting the ball into which is the object of play. Each hole, of which there are usually eighteen as the standard on a full course, is located on a prepared surface, called the green, of a particular type grass.
    2. (golf) The part of a game in which a player attempts to hit the ball into one of the holes.
      I played 18 holes yesterday.  The second hole today cost me three strokes over par.
    3. (baseball) The rear portion of the defensive team between the shortstop and the third baseman.
      The shortstop ranged deep into the hole to make the stop.
    4. (chess) A square on the board, with some positional significance, that a player does not, and cannot in future, control with a friendly pawn.
    5. (stud poker) A card (also called a hole card) dealt face down thus unknown to all but its holder; the status in which such a card is.
  3. (archaeology, slang) An excavation pit or trench.
  4. (figuratively) A weakness, a flaw
    I have found a hole in your argument.
    • 2011, Fun - We Are Young
      But between the drinks and subtle things / The holes in my apologies, you know / I’m trying hard to take it back
  5. (informal) A container or receptacle.
    car hole;  brain hole
  6. (physics) In semiconductors, a lack of an electron in an occupied band behaving like a positively charged particle.
  7. (computing) A security vulnerability in software which can be taken advantage of by an exploit.
  8. (slang anatomy) An orifice, in particular the anus.
  9. (informal, with “the”) Solitary confinement, a high-security prison cell often used as punishment.
  10. (slang) An undesirable place to live or visit; a hovel.
    His apartment is a hole!
  11. (figuratively) Difficulty, in particular, debt.
    If you find yourself in a hole, stop digging.
  12. (graph theory) A chordless cycle in a graph.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

hole (third-person singular simple present holes, present participle holing, simple past and past participle holed)

  1. (transitive) To make holes in (an object or surface).
    Shrapnel holed the ship's hull.
  2. (transitive, by extension) To destroy.
    She completely holed the argument.
  3. To go or get into a hole.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ben Jonson to this entry?)
  4. (transitive) To cut, dig, or bore a hole or holes in.
    to hole a post for the insertion of rails or bars
  5. (transitive) To drive into a hole, as an animal, or a billiard ball or golf ball.
    Woods holed a standard three foot putt
  6. simple past tense of hele

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

hole

  1. First-person singular present of holen.
  2. First-person singular subjunctive I of holen.
  3. Third-person singular subjunctive I of holen.
  4. Imperative singular of holen.

HausaEdit

EtymologyEdit

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PronunciationEdit

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VerbEdit

hōlḕ (grade 4)

  1. to relax, to enjoy oneself