See also: Lakin and läkin

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Perhaps from Old Norse leika.

NounEdit

lakin (plural lakins)

  1. (rare) A toy.

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

lakin (plural lakins)

  1. Obsolete form of ladykin.
    • c. 1595–1596, William Shakespeare, A Midsommer Nights Dreame. [] (First Quarto), [London]: Printed by Iames Roberts, published 1600, OCLC 35186948, [Act III, scene i]:
      Bot[tom]. There are things in this Comedy of Piramus and Thisby, that will neuer pleaſe. Firſt, Piramus muſt draw a ſword to kill himſelfe; which the Ladys cannot abide. How anſwer you that? / Snout. Berlaken, a parlous feare.
      Bottom. There are things in this comedy of Pyramus and Thisbe that will never please. First, Pyramus must draw a sword to kill himself, which the ladies cannot abide. How do you answer that? / Snout. By 'r lakin [i.e., by our Lady], a dire problem.

AnagramsEdit


AzerbaijaniEdit

Other scripts
Cyrillic лакин
Roman lakin
Perso-Arabic لاکین

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately from Arabic لٰكِنْ(lākin, but, however).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈlaːkin]
  • Hyphenation: la‧kin

ConjunctionEdit

lakin

  1. but, however
    Synonyms: amma, ancaq, fəqət

FinnishEdit

NounEdit

lakin

  1. Genitive singular form of lakki.

AnagramsEdit


TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately from Arabic لٰكِنْ(lākin, but).

ConjunctionEdit

lakin

  1. but, however