landlady

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

land +‎ lady

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

landlady (plural landladies)

  1. A female landlord.
    • 1891, Thomas Hardy, chapter IV, in Tess of the d’Urbervilles: A Pure Woman Faithfully Presented [], volume I, London: James R[ipley] Osgood, McIlvaine and Co., [], OCLC 13623666, phase the first (The Maiden), pages 40–41:
      In a large bedroom upstairs, the window of which was thickly curtained with a great woollen shawl lately discarded by the landlady, Mrs. Rolliver, were gathered on this evening nearly a dozen persons, all seeking vinous bliss; all old inhabitants of the nearer end of Marlott, and frequenters of this retreat.
    • 1959 April, B. Perren, “The Essex Coast Branches of the Great Eastern Line”, in Trains Illustrated, page 191:
      Yet Clacton, like every other station at a big seaside resort, is bedevilled by the traditional insistence of boarding-house landladies that their clients must arrive on Saturday before lunch and leave on Saturday after breakfast.

TranslationsEdit