Open main menu

Wiktionary β

See also: Land, länd, lǟnd, and -land

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English land, lond, from Old English land, lond (earth, land, soil, ground; defined piece of land, territory, realm, province, district; landed property; country (not town); ridge in a ploughed field), from Proto-Germanic *landą (land), from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath). Cognate with Scots land (land), West Frisian lân (land), Dutch land (land, country), German Land (land, country, state), Norwegian and Swedish land (land, country, shore, territory), Icelandic land (land). Non-Germanic cognates include Old Irish lann (heath), Welsh llan (enclosure), Breton lann (heath), Old Church Slavonic лѧдо (lędo), from Proto-Slavic *lęda (heath, wasteland) and Albanian lëndinë (heath, grassland).

NounEdit

land (countable and uncountable, plural lands)

  1. The part of Earth which is not covered by oceans or other bodies of water.
    Most insects live on land.
  2. Real estate or landed property; a partitioned and measurable area which is owned and on which buildings can be erected.
    There are 50 acres of land in this estate.
  3. A country or region.
    They come from a faraway land.
  4. A person's country of origin and/or homeplace; homeland.
  5. The soil, in respect to its nature or quality for farming.
    wet land; good or bad land for growing potatoes
  6. A general country, state, or territory.
    He moved from his home to settle in a faraway land.
  7. (often in combination) realm, domain.
    I'm going to Disneyland.
    Maybe that's how it works in TV-land, but not in the real world.
  8. (agriculture) The ground left unploughed between furrows; any of several portions into which a field is divided for ploughing.
  9. (Ireland, colloquial) A fright.
    He got an awful land when the police arrived.
  10. (electronics) A conducting area on a board or chip which can be used for connecting wires.
  11. In a compact disc or similar recording medium, an area of the medium which does not have pits.
  12. (travel) The non-airline portion of an itinerary. Hotel, tours, cruises, etc.
    Our city offices sell a lot more land than our suburban offices.
  13. (obsolete) The ground or floor.
    • Spenser
      Herself upon the land she did prostrate.
  14. (nautical) The lap of the strakes in a clinker-built boat; the lap of plates in an iron vessel; called also landing.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  15. In any surface prepared with indentations, perforations, or grooves, that part of the surface which is not so treated, such as the level part of a millstone between the furrows.
    1. (ballistics) The space between the rifling grooves in a gun.
    • 2008 August 1, Steele, Lisa, “Ballistics”, in Eric York Drogin, editor, Science for Lawyers, American Bar Association, page 16:
      The FBI maintains a database, the General Rifling Characteristics (GRC) file, which is organized by caliber, number of lands and grooves, direction of twist, and width of lands and grooves, to help an examiner figure out the origin of a recovered bullet.
    • 2012 November 15, Jonny Lee Miller as Sherlock Holmes, “One Way to Get Off”, in Elementary, season 1, episode 7:
      The human eye is a precision instrument. It can detect grooves and lands on a slug more efficiently than any computer.
HyponymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

land (third-person singular simple present lands, present participle landing, simple past and past participle landed)

  1. (intransitive) To descend to a surface, especially from the air.
    The plane is about to land.
  2. (dated) To alight, to descend from a vehicle.
    • 1859, “Rules adopted by the Sixth Avenue Railway, N. Y.”, quoted in Alexander Easton, A Practical Treatise on Street or Horse-Power Railways, page 108:
      10. You will be civil and attentive to passengers, giving proper assistance to ladies and children getting in or out, and never start the car before passengers are fairly received or landed.
  3. (intransitive) To come into rest.
  4. (intransitive) To arrive at land, especially a shore, or a dock, from a body of water.
  5. (transitive) To bring to land.
    It can be tricky to land a helicopter.
    Use the net to land the fish.
    • Shakespeare
      I'll undertake to land them on our coast.
  6. (transitive) To acquire; to secure.
    • 2012 May 5, Phil McNulty, “Chelsea 2-1 Liverpool”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      As Di Matteo celebrated and captain John Terry raised the trophy for the fourth time, the Italian increased his claims to become the permanent successor to Andre Villas-Boas by landing a trophy.
  7. (transitive) To deliver.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

land (not comparable)

  1. Of or relating to land.
  2. Residing or growing on land.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English hland.

NounEdit

land (uncountable)

  1. lant; urine

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for land in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch land, from Old Dutch lant, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath).

NounEdit

land (plural lande)

  1. country; nation

DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Danish land, from Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

land n (singular definite landet, plural indefinite lande)

  1. country (nation state)
  2. land
  3. part of Earth that is not covered in water
    Vi kom i land i går.
  4. (chiefly definite singular) countryside
    Han bor på landet.
Usage notesEdit

In compounds: land-, lande-, lands-.

InflectionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See lande (to land).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

land

  1. imperative of lande

Etymology 3Edit

From land (country). Possibly influenced by proper nouns like English Disneyland and Danish Legoland. [from 1969]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

*land n

  1. (bound morpheme, only used as the last part of compounds) a large area or facility dedicated to a certain type of activity or merchandise
CompoundsEdit

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch lant, from Old Dutch lant, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

land n (plural landen, diminutive landje n)

  1. land; country
  2. land (part of Earth not covered by water)

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

land

  1. first-person singular present indicative of landen
  2. imperative of landen

ElfdalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath). Cognate with Swedish land.

NounEdit

land n

  1. country; nation

DeclensionEdit


FaroeseEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath).

NounEdit

land n (genitive singular lands, plural lond)

  1. land
  2. coast
  3. country, nation
  4. ground, soil
  5. the state
DeclensionEdit
n8 Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative land landið lond londini
Accusative land landið lond londini
Dative landi landinum londum londunum
Genitive lands landsins landa landanna
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse hland, from Proto-Germanic *hlandą, from Proto-Indo-European *klān- (liquid, wet ground). Cognate with Lithuanian klanas (pool, puddle, slop).

NounEdit

land n (genitive singular lands, uncountable)

  1. (uncountable) urine
DeclensionEdit
n8 Singular
Indefinite Definite
Nominative land landið
Accusative land landið
Dative landi landinum
Genitive lands landsins

GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

land

  1. Romanization of 𐌻𐌰𐌽𐌳

IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

land n (genitive singular lands, nominative plural lönd)

  1. (uncountable) land, earth, ground (part of the Earth not under water)
  2. (countable) country
    Japan er fallegt land.
    Japan is a beautiful country.
  3. (uncountable) countryside, country
    Ég bý úti á landi.
    I live in the country.
  4. (uncountable) land, as a mass noun, measurable in quantity
  5. (countable) tracts of land, an estate
    Ég á þetta land og allt sem er á því.
    I own this land and everything on it.

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath). Akin to English land.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

land n (definite singular landet, indefinite plural land, definite plural landa)

  1. country
    Noreg er eit land i nord.
    Norway is a country in the north.
  2. land
    Det var mangel på land for jordbruk.
    There was a lack of land for agriculture.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą.

NounEdit

land n (genitive lanz, plural land)

  1. land
    • 1241, Codex Holmiensis, prologue.
      Mæth logh skal land byggæs.
      With law shall land be built.

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath). Cognate with Old Saxon land, Old Frisian land, lond, Old Dutch lant (Dutch land), Old High German lant (German Land), Old Norse land (Swedish land), Gothic 𐌻𐌰𐌽𐌳 (land). The Proto-Indo-European root is also the source of Proto-Celtic *landā (Welsh llan (enclosure), Breton lann (heath)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

land n

  1. earth, one of the four elements
  2. a land, region, district, or province
  3. owned or tilled land, an estate

DeclensionEdit

Derived prefix termsEdit

Derived suffix termsEdit

Derived national termsEdit

Related termsEdit

  • belandian (to bereave of land, dispossess)
  • belendan (to bereave of land, dispossess)
  • ġelandian (to land, to become land)
  • ġelendan (to near, land, or come into lands as wealth)
  • lendan (to come to land)

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old IrishEdit

NounEdit

land ?

  1. Alternative spelling of lann

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
land
also lland after a proclitic
land
pronounced with /l(ʲ)-/
land
also lland after a proclitic
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old NorseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath). Cognate with Old Saxon land, Old Frisian land, lond, Old English land, lond, Old Dutch lant, Old High German lant, Gothic 𐌻𐌰𐌽𐌳 (land).

NounEdit

land n (genitive lands, plural lǫnd)

  1. land

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Norwegian Bokmål: land
  • Norwegian Nynorsk: land
  • Swedish: land

Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath). Cognate with Old English land, lond, Old Frisian land, lond, Dutch land, Old High German lant (German Land), Old Norse land (Swedish land), Gothic 𐌻𐌰𐌽𐌳 (land). The Proto-Indo-European root is also the source of Proto-Celtic *landā (Welsh llan (enclosure), Breton lann (heath)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

land n

  1. land

DeclensionEdit


DescendantsEdit

  • German Low German: Land

Old SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą.

NounEdit

land n

  1. land

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From German Land.

NounEdit

land m inan

  1. (Poznań dialect) rural area: the country(side)

SynonymsEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Swedish land, from Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

land n

  1. a land, a country, a nation, a state
  2. (uncountable) land, ground, earth, territory; as opposed to sea or air
    land i sikte!
    land in sight!
    efter kriget tvangs förlorande staterna avträda mycket land
    after the war, the losing states had to cede much land
  3. (uncountable) land, countryside, earth, ground suitable for farming; as opposed to towns and cities
    livet på landet
    life in the countryside
    stad och land
    town and country
  4. a garden plot, short for trädgårdsland; small piece of ground for growing vegetables, flowers, etc.

DeclensionEdit

Declension of land 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative land landet land landen
Genitive lands landets lands landens

SynonymsEdit

  • (country): nation
  • (neither sea nor air): backe, landbacke, mark
  • (ground suitable for farming): mark (owned land in general, for farming or not)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit