See also: Land, länd, lǟnd, and -land

English edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English lond, land, from Old English land, from Proto-West Germanic *land, from Proto-Germanic *landą (land), from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath).

Cognate with Scots laund (land), West Frisian lân (land), Dutch land (land, country), German Land (land, country, state), Norwegian and Swedish land (land, country, shore, territory), Icelandic land (land). Non-Germanic cognates include Old Irish lann (heath), Welsh llan (enclosure), Breton lann (heath), Old Church Slavonic лѧдо (lędo), from Proto-Slavic *lęda (heath, wasteland) and Albanian lëndinë (heath, grassland).

Noun edit

land (countable and uncountable, plural lands)

  1. The part of Earth which is not covered by oceans or other bodies of water.
    Most insects live on land.
  2. Real estate or landed property; a partitioned and measurable area which is owned and acquired and on which buildings and structures can be built and erected.
    There are 50 acres of land in this estate.
  3. A country or region.
    They come from a faraway land.
  4. A person's country of origin and/or homeplace; homeland.
  5. The soil, in respect to its nature or quality for farming.
    wet land    good or bad land for growing potatoes
  6. (often in combination) realm, domain.
    I'm going to Disneyland.
    Maybe that's how it works in TV-land, but not in the real world.
  7. (agriculture) The ground left unploughed between furrows; any of several portions into which a field is divided for ploughing.
    Synonym: (obsolete except Britain, dialectal) furlong
  8. (Ireland, colloquial) A shock or fright.
    He got an awful land when the police arrived.
  9. (electronics) A conducting area on a board or chip which can be used for connecting wires.
  10. On a compact disc or similar recording medium, an area of the medium which does not have pits.
    • 1935, H. Courtney Bryson, The Gramophone Record, page 72:
      Now, assume that the recording is being done with 100 grooves per inch, and that the record groove is .006 inch wide. This means that the land on either side on any given groove in the absence of sound waves is .004 inch.
  11. (travel) The non-airline portion of an itinerary. Hotel, tours, cruises, etc.
    Our city offices sell a lot more land than our suburban offices.
  12. (obsolete) The ground or floor.
  13. (nautical) The lap of the strakes in a clinker-built boat; the lap of plates in an iron vessel; called also landing.[1]
  14. In any surface prepared with indentations, perforations, or grooves, that part of the surface which is not so treated, such as the level part of a millstone between the furrows.
    1. (ballistics) The space between the rifling grooves in a gun.
      • 2008 August 1, Lisa Steele, “Ballistics”, in Eric York Drogin, editor, Science for Lawyers, American Bar Association, page 16:
        The FBI maintains a database, the General Rifling Characteristics (GRC) file, which is organized by caliber, number of lands and grooves, direction of twist, and width of lands and grooves, to help an examiner figure out the origin of a recovered bullet.
      • 2012 November 15, “One Way to Get Off”, in Elementary, season 1, episode 7, spoken by Sherlock Holmes (Jonny Lee Miller):
        The human eye is a precision instrument. It can detect grooves and lands on a slug more efficiently than any computer.
  15. (Scotland, historical) A group of dwellings or tenements under one roof and having a common entry.
Hyponyms edit
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Verb edit

land (third-person singular simple present lands, present participle landing, simple past and past participle landed)

  1. (intransitive) To descend to a surface, especially from the air.
    The plane is about to land.
  2. (dated) To alight, to descend from a vehicle.
    • 1859, “Rules adopted by the Sixth Avenue Railway, N. Y.”, quoted in Alexander Easton, A Practical Treatise on Street or Horse-Power Railways, page 108:
      10. You will be civil and attentive to passengers, giving proper assistance to ladies and children getting in or out, and never start the car before passengers are fairly received or landed.
  3. (intransitive) To come into rest.
  4. (intransitive) To arrive on land, especially a shore or dock, from a body of water.
  5. (transitive) To bring to land.
    It can be tricky to land a helicopter.
    Use the net to land the fish.
  6. (transitive, informal) To capture or arrest.
    • 1920 June, The Electrical Experimenter, New York, page 151, column 3:
      `He told me that he was certain that Coates shot at him. We threw out a drag and landed Coates within an hour.'
  7. (transitive) To acquire; to secure.
    • 2012 May 5, Phil McNulty, “Chelsea 2-1 Liverpool”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      As Di Matteo celebrated and captain John Terry raised the trophy for the fourth time, the Italian increased his claims to become the permanent successor to Andre Villas-Boas by landing a trophy.
  8. (slang, transitive) To succeed in having sexual relations with; to score
    Too ugly to ever land a chick
  9. (transitive) (of a blow) To deliver.
    If you land a knockout blow, you’ll win the match
  10. (intransitive) (of a punch) To connect
    If the punches land, you might lose a few teeth!
  11. (intransitive) To go down well with an audience.
    Some of the comedian's jokes failed to land.
Derived terms edit
terms derived from the verb land
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Middle English *land, from Old English hland. More at lant.

Noun edit

land (uncountable)

  1. lant; urine

References edit

  1. ^ Edward H[enry] Knight (1877), “Land”, in Knight’s American Mechanical Dictionary. [], volume II (GAS–REA), New York, N.Y.: Hurd and Houghton [], →OCLC.

Afrikaans edit

Etymology edit

From Dutch land, from Old Dutch lant, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

land (plural lande)

  1. country; nation

Danish edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Danish land, from Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, cognate with English land, German Land.

Noun edit

land n (singular definite landet, plural indefinite lande)

  1. country (a geographical area that is politically independent)
    Synonyms: stat, nation
  2. (uncountable, chiefly definite singular) country, countryside (rural areas outside the cities with agricultural production)
  3. land (part of Earth that is not covered in water)
  4. (as the last part of compounds) a large area or facility dedicated to a certain type of activity or merchandise
Usage notes edit

In compounds: land-, lande-, lands-.

Declension edit
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb edit

land

  1. imperative of lande

Dutch edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle Dutch lant, from Old Dutch lant, from Proto-West Germanic *land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath).

Noun edit

land n (plural landen, diminutive landje n)

  1. land; country
    • 1967, E. Rijpma & F. G. Schuringa, edited by Jan van Bakel, Nederlandse spraakkunst, 21st ed., p. 24, § 8 (also online at dbnl.org):
      In ons land werd door de Westgermaanse volksstammen het Nederduits (Nederfrankisch en Saksisch) en het Fries gesproken.
      Het Nederfrankisch wordt wel verdeeld in: (1) het Hollands-Frankisch (Hollands, Utrechts, Westveluws, Zeeuws, Westvlaams); (2) het Brabants-Frankisch (Westbetuws, Westbrabants, Antwerps, Kempens, Leuvens, Aalsters, Oostvlaams); (3) het Limburgs-Frankisch (Gelders-Limburgs, Limburgs, Oostbrabants).
      Het Saksisch (Gelders-Overijssels, Oostveluws, Drents, Gronings) wordt gesproken in het noordoosten van ons land, van Groningen tot de Oude Ijssel.
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)
  2. land (part of Earth not covered by water)
  3. (Netherlands, Antilles) a constituent country of the Kingdom of the Netherlands; the territorial government of an overseas constituent country
    • 2022 December 6, Oscar van Dam, John Samson, “Gerechtshof: lhbt’s mogen trouwen op Aruba en Curaçao [Appellate court: LGBT people allowed to marry in Aruba and Curaçao]”, in Caribisch Netwerk[2], retrieved 14 December 2022:
      Het zijn twee verschillende uitspraken die vandaag door het gerechtshof achter elkaar zijn gedaan. Voor Aruba gaat het om het een zaak van Fundacion Orguyo Aruba en twee vrouwen tegen het Land Aruba. Voor Curaçao gaat het om een zaak van Human Rights Caribbean Foundation en twee vrouwen tegen het Land Curaçao.
      Today's rulings are two separate ones handed down by the appellate court back-to-back. For Aruba, it involves a case brought by Fundacion Orguyo Aruba and two women against the government of Aruba. For Curaçao, it involves a case brought by Human Rights Caribbean Foundation and two women against the government of Curaçao.
  4. (history, chiefly in compounds) the territorial government or state authority in a Dutch colony or overseas territory in the West Indies
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
  • Afrikaans: land
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: alanda, landi
  • Negerhollands: land, lant, lan
  • Skepi Creole Dutch: land, lantta
  • Sranan Tongo: lanti (see there for further descendants)

Etymology 2 edit

Verb edit

land

  1. inflection of landen:
    1. first-person singular present indicative
    2. imperative

Elfdalian edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath). Cognate with Swedish land.

Noun edit

land n

  1. country; nation

Declension edit

Faroese edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath).

Noun edit

land n (genitive singular lands, plural lond)

  1. land
  2. coast
  3. country, nation
  4. ground, soil
  5. the state
Declension edit
n8 Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative land landið lond londini
Accusative land landið lond londini
Dative landi landinum londum londunum
Genitive lands landsins landa landanna
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Norse hland, from Proto-Germanic *hlandą, from Proto-Indo-European *klān- (liquid, wet ground). Cognate with Lithuanian klanas (pool, puddle, slop).

Noun edit

land n (genitive singular lands, uncountable)

  1. (uncountable) urine
Declension edit
n8 Singular
Indefinite Definite
Nominative land landið
Accusative land landið
Dative landi landinum
Genitive lands landsins

French edit

Noun edit

land m (plural lands or länder)

  1. land (region of Germany or Austria)

Gothic edit

Romanization edit

land

  1. Romanization of 𐌻𐌰𐌽𐌳

Icelandic edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

land n (genitive singular lands, nominative plural lönd)

  1. (uncountable) land, earth, ground (part of the Earth not under water)
  2. (countable) country
    Japan er fallegt land.
    Japan is a beautiful country.
  3. (uncountable) countryside, country
    Ég bý úti á landi.
    I live in the country.
  4. (uncountable) land, as a mass noun, measurable in quantity
  5. (countable) tracts of land, an estate
    Ég á þetta land og allt sem er á því.
    I own this land and everything on it.

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Middle English edit

Noun edit

land

  1. Alternative form of lond

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath).

Noun edit

land n (definite singular landet, indefinite plural land, definite plural landa or landene)

  1. country
  2. land
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Verb edit

land

  1. imperative of lande

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath). Akin to English land.

Noun edit

land n (definite singular landet, indefinite plural land, definite plural landa)

  1. country
    Noreg er eit land i nord.
    Norway is a country in the north.
  2. land
    Det var mangel på land for jordbruk.
    There was a lack of land for agriculture.
  3. coast, dry land
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Norse hland, from Proto-Germanic *hlandą.

Noun edit

land n (definite singular landet, indefinite plural land, definite plural landa)

  1. urine from livestock

References edit

Old Danish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą.

Noun edit

land n (genitive lanz, plural land)

  1. land
    • 1241, Codex Holmiensis, prologue:
      Mæth logh skal land byggæs.
      With law shall land be built.

Declension edit

Descendants edit

Old English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-West Germanic *land, from Proto-Germanic *landą. See there for more.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

land n

  1. land (dry portion of the Earth's surface)
  2. a country
  3. region within a country: district, province
  4. the country, countryside
  5. owned or tilled land, an estate

Usage notes edit

  • Using the word land is the most common way to form country names. This can be done in one of two ways:
    • Prefixing the name of a people to the word land. Ex: Franca (French person)Francland (France), Swēo (Swede)Swēoland (Sweden), and *Unger (a Hungarian)Ungerland (Hungary).
    • Prefacing land with the genitive plural form of a people, producing the literal meaning “land of ____ people.” Ex: Egypta land (Egypt, literally land of the Egyptians), Siġelhearwena land (Ethiopia, literally land of the Ethiopians).
  • However, country names can also be formed other ways. For instance, words other than land are used: Dene (a Dane)Denemearc (Denmark, literally Dane borderland). It is also very common to use the name of a people for the country they inhabit: On þām dagum wæs Alexander ġeboren on Crēcum swā swā miċel ȳst cōme ofer ealne middanġeard (“In those days, Alexander was born in Greece [lit. in the Greeks] like a great storm coming over the whole world”), Ymb twā ġēar þæs þe hē cōm of Francum, hē ġefōr (”Two years after he came from France [lit. from the Franks], he died”). In addition, country names are sometimes loaned directly from Latin: Arabia, Isrāēl, Italia, Syria. Finally, some country names are simply idiomatic: Norþweġ (Norway, literally north way).
  • Unlike most words, land undergoes i-umlaut when combined with the suffix -isċ: inlendisċ (native), uplendisċ (rural).

Declension edit

Derived prefix terms
Derived suffix terms
Derived national terms

Descendants edit

References edit

Old Irish edit

Noun edit

land ?

  1. Alternative spelling of lann

Mutation edit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
land
also lland after a proclitic
land
pronounced with /l(ʲ)-/
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old Norse edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath). Cognate with Old Saxon land, Old Frisian land, lond, Old English land, lond, Old Dutch lant, Old High German lant, Gothic 𐌻𐌰𐌽𐌳 (land).

Noun edit

land n (genitive lands, plural lǫnd)

  1. land

Declension edit

Descendants edit

References edit

  • land inGeir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Old Saxon edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-West Germanic *land. Cognate with Old English land, lond, Old Frisian land, lond, Dutch land, Old High German lant (German Land), Old Norse land (Swedish land), Gothic 𐌻𐌰𐌽𐌳 (land). The Proto-Indo-European root is also the source of Proto-Celtic *landā (Welsh llan (enclosure), Breton lann (heath)).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

land n

  1. land

Declension edit


Descendants edit

Old Swedish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą.

Noun edit

land n

  1. land

Declension edit

Descendants edit

Polish edit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology edit

Borrowed from German Land, from Middle High German lant, from Old High German lant, from Proto-West Germanic *land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

land m inan

  1. Land (federal state in Austria and Germany)
    Synonym: kraj związkowy
  2. (Poznań) countryside (rural area)
    Synonyms: prowincja, wieś

Declension edit

Further reading edit

  • land in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • land in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from German Land.

Noun edit

land n (plural landuri)

  1. land (German and Austrian province)

Declension edit

Spanish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from German Land.

Noun edit

land m (plural lands)

  1. one of the federal states of Germany
    • 2020 January 29, “El coronavirus ya se transmite fuera de China y se teme por su afectación al Mobile”, in La Vanguardia[3]:
      Alemania confirmó ayer los cuatro primeros casos de coronavirus de Wuhan en su territorio, todos pertenecientes a la misma empresa de componentes de automóvil del land alemán de Baviera.
      Germany yesterday confirmed the first four cases of Wuhan coronavirus on its territory, all belonging to the same automotive component company from the German land of Bavaria.

Further reading edit

Swedish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Swedish land, from Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /land/, [l̪an̪ːd̪], (colloquial) /lan/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -and

Noun edit

land n

  1. a country, a land (independent political entity)
    Sverige är ett land
    Sweden is a country
    länderna i EU
    the countries in the EU
    främmande länder
    foreign lands
    fjärran länder
    distant lands

Declension edit

Declension of land 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative land landet länder länderna
Genitive lands landets länders ländernas

See also edit

Noun edit

land n

  1. (uncountable) land (as opposed to sea)
    Om man inte har lust att vara på en båt så kan man vara på land istället
    If you don't feel like being on a boat, you can be on land instead
    land och hav
    land and sea
    ha land i sikte
    have land in sight
    Land i sikte!
    Land ahoy!
  2. (usually in the definite) countryside, country
    Vi bor på landet
    We live in the countryside
    Vi är ute på landet
    We are out in the country
    livet på landet
    life in the countryside
    stad och land
    town and country
    laglöst land
    lawless land

Usage notes edit

See mark for some other senses of land.

Declension edit

Declension of land 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative land landet
Genitive lands landets

See also edit

Noun edit

land n

  1. a smaller piece of land for small-scale cultivation; a patch, a garden plot, etc.
    ett jordgubbsland
    a strawberry patch
    ett potatisland
    a potato patch
    påta i landet
    potter in the garden plot

Declension edit

Declension of land 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative land landet land landen
Genitive lands landets lands landens

Derived terms edit

Derived terms edit

References edit

Zealandic edit

Etymology edit

From Middle Dutch lant.

Noun edit

land n (plural [please provide])

  1. land