limitrophe

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French limitrophe, from Latin limitrophus.

AdjectiveEdit

limitrophe

  1. Border, frontier; being or existing along a border or frontier.
    • 1877, Great Britain. Parliament. House of Commons, Accounts and Papers of the House of Commons, page 272:
      As was stipulated in the Firman of 1249, Servia shall be bound to send back home all emigrants from the limitrophe provinces, and, with the exception of the fortresses which exist in Servia ab antiquo, all fortifications subsequently erected   []
    • 1973, Franklin Howard Olmsted, Omar Joseph Loeltz, Burdge Irelan, Geohydrology of the Yuma Area, Arizona and California:
      The total westward movement of ground water into Mexicali Valley adjacent to the limitrophe section, thus, was about 36,000 acre-feet in 1960. The data on which the foregoing estimate is based are very meager.
    • 2011, Katherine Ott Verburg, Colorado River Documents 2008 (Hardcover Book and Autoloading DVD), Government Printing Office (→ISBN), page 14:
      Ongoing Cooperation with Mexico Concerns regarding the riparian and estuarine ecology of the Colorado River in the limitrophe section (the approximately 24-mile portion of the Colorado River where the river forms the border []
    • 2017, Oleg Bazaluk, The Theory of War and Peace: The Geophilosophy of Europe, Cambridge Scholars Publishing (→ISBN), page 161:
      The problem lies in the rhizome – in the plane of understanding of the difference between mental space-aggressors and mental space-victims, which include all the limitrophe states.

NounEdit

limitrophe (plural limitrophes)

  1. A border state or area.

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French limitrophe, from Latin limitrophus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

limitrophe (plural limitrophes)

  1. bordering
    un pays limitrophea bordering country, a neighbouring country

DescendantsEdit

  • English: limitrophe

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit