ludus

Contents

EsperantoEdit

VerbEdit

ludus

  1. conditional of ludi

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Along with ludo, it is either from Proto-Indo-European *leid ‎(to play) or from Etruscan.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lūdus m ‎(genitive lūdī); second declension

  1. school
  2. game, sport, play
  3. (in plural) public spectacle, games, stage plays/productions
  4. fun

DeclensionEdit

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative lūdus lūdī
genitive lūdī lūdōrum
dative lūdō lūdīs
accusative lūdum lūdōs
ablative lūdō lūdīs
vocative lūde lūdī

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • ludus” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.
  • ludus” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to give funeral games in honour of a person: ludos funebres alicui dare
    • an elementary school: ludus (discendi or litterarum)
    • the piece; the play: fabula, ludus scaenicus
    • to institute games: ludos apparare
    • to give public games in honour of Jupiter: ludos facere, edere (Iovi)
    • to revive public games: ludos instaurare
    • a school for gladiators: ludus gladiatorius
    • crowded games: celebritas ludorum
    • sumptuous public games: magnificentia ludorum
    • (ambiguous) performances in the circus; theatrical perfomances: ludi circenses, scaenici
    • (ambiguous) sumptuous public games: ludi apparatissimi
    • (ambiguous) the Olympian, Pythian games: ludi Olympia (not ludi Olympici), Pythia
    • (ambiguous) gymnastic contests: ludi gymnici

Professor Kidd, et al. Collins Gem Latin Dictionary. HarperCollins Publishers (Glasgow: 2004). ISBN 0-00-470763-X. page 207.

Read in another language