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See also: Lunt

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch lont.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lunt (plural lunts)

  1. A slow-burning match or torch.
    • 1844, E. A. Friedlænder (translator), The Amber Witch [1838, Abraham Schweidler (Wilhelm Meinhold), Maria Schweidler, die Bernsteinhexe], page 90,
      In the mean time, however, he himself (understand; the young Nobilis) had seen that a fine smoke issued from the nostrils of the steed, and as he stooped down, he had immediately pulled forth a lunt, almost of a finger's length, the which was yet burning, and which a knave had privily poked into his nostrils with a needle.
    • 1969, Robert Nye, Tales I Told My Mother,
      Bent down and saw I was right. A lunt up the bugger’s nose. A lunt? said Doctor Copper. Almost as long as your left forefinger, yes, said his visitor. Still burning.
    • 1999, Igorʹ Mikhaĭlovich Dʹi͡akonov, The Paths of History, page 149,
      The gunpowder was stamped into the tube, then a lead ball was put into the muzzle, a wad was stamped over it, and the charge was set fire to by a lunt through the lower hole.
  2. Smoke with flames, especially from a pipe.

VerbEdit

lunt (third-person singular simple present lunts, present participle lunting, simple past and past participle lunted)

  1. (Scotland) To emit smoke.
    • 18th c, Robert Burns, The Twa Dogs, 1822, The Poetical Works of Robert Burns, page 28,
      The lunting pipe, and sneeshing mill, / Are handed round wi' right gude-will;
    • 1832, Tait's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 2, page 377,
      My conscience! ye lent a ready hand in the brulzie; but what can ha'e set the Magazines a-lunting? it's a mystery o' mysteries. [] Especially as it's their game to set everybody a-lunting, and keep out of the conflagration themselves.
  2. (Scotland) To walk while smoking a pipe.
    • 2014, Robert P. Wills, Tales From A Second Hand Wand Shoppe, Book 1: They Were the Best of Gnomes, They Were the Worst of Gnomes, page 278,
      Lunting?” interrupted Julie, eyebrow raised.
      Grimbledung shrugged, “It's a good and proper word”, he raised an eyebrow back, "it just doesn't get used that much."
      Julie smirked, “Go on then, with your lunting.”
      He let out a sigh. "As I was saying, I was sitting there when a Minotaur came lunting up." He paused for a moment, "Pipe in mouth, walking along", he winked at Julie, [] .

DanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

lunt

  1. neuter singular of lun

IngrianEdit

NounEdit

lunt

  1. partitive singular of lumi

Norwegian BokmålEdit

AdjectiveEdit

lunt

  1. neuter singular of lun

Norwegian NynorskEdit

AdjectiveEdit

lunt

  1. neuter singular of lun