Open main menu

Wiktionary β

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French mésalliance, from mésallier (to misally).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mésalliance (plural mésalliances)

  1. Marriage with a person of inferior social position.
    • 1840, William Makepeace Thackeray, The Paris Sketchbook, "On the French School of Painting":
      The case is very different in England, where a grocer's daughter would think she made a mésalliance by marrying a painter ...
    • 1848, William Makepeace Thackeray, Vanity Fair, Chapter 6:
      He had been revolving in his mind the marriage question pending between Jos and Rebecca, and was not over well pleased that a member of a family into which he, George Osborne, of the —th, was going to marry, should make a mésalliance with a little nobody–a little upstart governess.
    • 1871–72, George Eliot, Middlemarch, Chapter 37
      It was an abominable thing that my grandmother should have been disinherited because she made what they called a mesalliance, though there was nothing to be said against her husband except that he was a Polish refugee who gave lessons for his bread.
    • 1907, Ambrose Bierce, Beyond the Walls:
      To a mésalliance of that kind every globule of my ancestral blood spoke in opposition.
    • 1941, Aylmer and Louise Maude translation of Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace:
      But if you marry the old count you will make his last days happy, and as widow of the Grand...the prince would no longer be making a mésalliance by marrying you.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From mésalli(er) +‎ -ance.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mésalliance f (plural mésalliances)

  1. misalliance, mésalliance

Further readingEdit